Journal List > J Nutr Health > v.51(6) > 1111486

J Nutr Health. 2018 Dec;51(6):538-555. Korean.
Published online Dec 31, 2018.  https://doi.org/10.4163/jnh.2018.51.6.538
© 2018 The Korean Nutrition Society
Association of coffee consumption with health-related quality of life and metabolic syndrome in Korean adults: based on 2013 ~ 2016 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
Hyesook Kim, Yu Jin Kim, Yeni Lim and Oran Kwon
Department of Nutritional Science and Food Management, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 03760, Korea.

To whom correspondence should be addressed. tel: +82-2-3277-6860, Email: orank@ewha.ac.kr
Received Oct 12, 2018; Revised Oct 21, 2018; Accepted Oct 31, 2018.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Abstract

Purpose

This study examined the association of the type and frequency of coffee consumption with the health-related quality of life and metabolic bio-markers in adult men and women from the 2013 ~ 2016 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES).

Methods

A total of 11,201 subjects (4,483 men and 6,718 women) were classified according to the type of coffee consumption (non-coffee, black coffee, 3-in-1 coffee) and type and frequency of coffee consumption (non-coffee, ≤2 times/day of black coffee, > 2 times/day of black coffee, ≤2 times/day of 3-in-1 coffee, > 2 times/day of 3-in-1 coffee) using food frequency questionnaires. Dietary nutrient intake data were assessed using food frequency questionnaires. The health-related quality of life was measured using the EuroQol-5 dimension (EQ-5D) and EQ-5D index score. Data on metabolic bio-markers were obtained from a health examination.

Results

Among men and women, the proportion of subjects with an energy intake below the estimated energy requirement (EER) was lower among the 3-in-1 coffee consumption group, and the proportion of subjects with iron intakes below the estimated average requirements (EAR) was lower among the 3-in-1 coffee consumption group. Women (OR: 0.810, 95% CI: 0.657 ~ 0.998) with the ≤2 times/day of 3-in-1 coffee had a lower risk of impaired health-related quality of life (lowest 20% level in the EQ-5D score) compared to the non-coffee consumers after a multivariable adjustment. In both men and women, the type and frequency of coffee consumption was not associated with metabolic bio-markers risk after multivariable adjustment.

Conclusion

These results suggest that 3-in-1 coffee consumption may be associated with a lower risk of impaired health-related quality of life and may not be associated with the metabolic bio-markers risk in adult men and women.

Keywords: 3-in 1 coffee; black coffee; consumption; health-related quality of life; metabolic syndrome

Figures


Fig. 1
Flow chart of the subject inclusion and exclusion criteria in the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) 2013–2016: (a) Association between coffee consumption and health-related quality of life, and (b) Association between coffee consumption and metabolic syndrome.
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Tables


Table 1
General characteristics of subjects according to the type of coffee consumption
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Table 2
Proportions of subjects with energy and nutrient intake below the EER and EAR according to the type of coffee consumption
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Table 3
ORs (95% CIs) of impaired health-related quality of life according to the type of coffee consumption
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Table 4
ORs (95% CIs) of impaired health-related quality of life according to the type and frequency of coffee consumption
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Table 5
Metabolic bio-markers of subjects according to the type of coffee consumption
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Table 6
Metabolic bio-markers of subjects according to the type and frequency of coffee consumption
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Table 7
ORs (95% CIs) of metabolic bio-markers risk according to the type of coffee consumption
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Table 8
ORs (95% CIs) of metabolic bio-markers risk according to the type and frequency of coffee consumption
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