Journal List > J Nutr Health > v.52(1) > 1117289

J Nutr Health. 2019 Feb;52(1):58-72. Korean.
Published online Feb 28, 2019.  https://doi.org/10.4163/jnh.2019.52.1.58
© 2019 The Korean Nutrition Society
Food and nutrient intake status of Korean elderly by perceived anxiety and depressive condition: data from Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2013 ~ 2015
Da-Mee Kim and Kyung-Hee Kim
Department of Food and Nutrition, Duksung Women's University, Seoul 01369, Korea.

To whom correspondence should be addressed. tel: +82-2-901-8591, Email: khkim@duksung.ac.kr
Received Dec 18, 2018; Revised Dec 27, 2018; Accepted Jan 11, 2019.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Abstract

Purpose

This study examined the food and nutrient intake of Korean elderly according to the anxiety and depressive condition using the data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Survey (KNHANES) from 2013 to 2015.

Methods

The participants were 3,504 elderly people over 65 years of age (1,523 in men and, 1,981 in women). The dietary information was analyzed using the 24-hour recall data. The anxiety and depressive state was assessed using the self-reported scale EQ-5D in the quality of life dimension. The subjects were divided into the anxiety · depression group (AD) and non-anxiety · depression group (NAD) according to their anxiety and depressive conditions.

Results

In the male elderly, the AD group had a significantly lower education and economic level and higher proportion in living alone than the NAD group. The percentage of eating lunch and dinner alone in the male AD group was higher than that of the NAD group. The female AD group showed less a lower frequency of dinner than the NAD group. The male AD group had a lower consumption of total foods, fish and shellfishes, seaweeds, mushrooms, oils and fats, and seasonings than the NAD group. With regard to the nutrient intake, the male elderly NAD group had more sufficient nutrient intakes than the AD group. In particular, the daily intakes of dietary fiber, riboflavin, niacin, potassium and iron were significantly lower in the AD group. To compare with the nutrient density of the two groups, the vitamin C and niacin intakes were lower in the AD group than in the NAD group. Overall, the nutritional status of the male AD group was significantly lower than that of the NAD group. Meanwhile, the female elderly had showed a smaller difference in nutrient intake according to their anxiety and depressive condition.

Conclusion

These results of this study show that more nutritional education and emotional support are needed to improve the nutritional status and health of the male elderly with anxiety or depression.

Keywords: elderly; nutrient intake; anxiety; depression; KNHANES

Tables


Table 1
General characteristics of the subjects according to perceived anxiety and depression
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Table 2
Perceived health status, smoking status and frequency of drinking of the subjects according to perceived anxiety and depression
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Table 3
Dietary habits of the subjects according to perceived anxiety and depression
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Table 4
Daily food intake from each food group of the subjects according to perceived anxiety and depression
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Table 5
Daily nutrient intakes of the subjects according to perceived anxiety and depression
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Table 6
Assessment of energy nutrients intake of the subjects according to perceived anxiety and depression
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Table 7
Index of nutritional quality, nutrient adequacy ratio and mean adequacy ratio of the subjects according to perceived anxiety and depression
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Notes

This work was supported by grants from Duksung Woman's University Research 2016.

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