Journal List > J Nutr Health > v.51(6) > 1111484

J Nutr Health. 2018 Dec;51(6):515-525. Korean.
Published online Dec 31, 2018.  https://doi.org/10.4163/jnh.2018.51.6.515
© 2018 The Korean Nutrition Society
Cereal intake status and nutritional status of adults: results from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2013 ~ 2016
Yun-Jung Bae
Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Korea National University of Transportation, Chungbuk 27909, Korea.

To whom correspondence should be addressed. tel: +82-43-820-5335, Email: byj@ut.ac.kr
Received Oct 30, 2018; Revised Nov 08, 2018; Accepted Nov 13, 2018.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Abstract

Purpose

This study was performed to evaluate the cereal intake status and explore its relationship with the nutritional status of the Korean adults from 2013 ~ 2016, Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES).

Methods

We analyzed dData from the combined 2013 ~ 2016 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were analyzed. The analysis included 12,199 adults aged from 19 to 64 years (male, n = 5,127, female, n = 7,072). In this study, according to cereal intake frequency (From food frequency questionnaire), we classified tThe subjects were classified according into the “non-cereal intake (NCI)” group (male, n = 4,290, female, n = 5,578), and “cereal intake (CI)” group (male, n = 837, female, n = 1,494) according to cereal intake frequency (From food frequency questionnaire).

Results

Typically, 79.6% of adults did not consume cereals (male 81.6%, female 77.3%);, 13.4% consumed cereals 1–3 times a month (male 12.2%, female 14.8%) and 7.1% consumed cereals more than once a week (male 6.2%, female 7.9%). In the case of both males and females, the nutrient density (nutrient intake per 1,000 kcal) and Index of Nutritional Quality (INQ) of protein, calcium, phosphorous, potassium, vitamin A, vitamin B1, vitamin B2, niacin, and vitamin C in the Non-Cereal group were significantly lower than those of the CI group (respectively, p < 0.01).

Conclusion

Our These results reveal highlight the low frequency of cereal intake in Korean adults and the better nutritional status in adults who consume cereals. It is hypothesized that tThe data of the present study would is expected to serve as basic data to improve the nutritional status of Korean adults.

Keywords: cereal; consumption; nutritional status; adults

Tables


Table 1
Nutritional evaluation of cereal per serving (30 g) by nutrition label (n = 24)
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Table 2
Nutritional evaluation of cereal and milk consumption (n = 24)
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Table 3
Cereal intake status from Food Frequency Questionnaire data
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Table 4
General characteristics of subjects according to the cereal consumption
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Table 5
Meal frequency of subjects according to the cereal consumption
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Table 6
Energy and nutrient intakes per 1,000 kcal of subjects according to the cereal consumption
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Table 7
Index of nutritional quality of subjects according to the cereal consumption
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