Journal List > J Nutr Health > v.51(3) > 1097789

J Nutr Health. 2018 Jun;51(3):228-241. Korean.
Published online June 28, 2018.  https://doi.org/10.4163/jnh.2018.51.3.228
© 2018 The Korean Nutrition Society
Effect of a public health center-based nutrition education program for hypertension in women older than 50 years of age
Seoyun Park,1 Jong-Sook Kwon,2 and Hye-Kyeong Kim1
1Department of Food Science and Nutrition, The Catholic University of Korea, Bucheon, Gyeonggi 14662, Korea.
2Department of Food and Nutrition, Shingu College, Seongnam, Gyeonggi 13174, Korea.

To whom correspondence should be addressed. tel: +82-2-2164-4314, Email: hkyeong@catholic.ac.kr
Received April 30, 2018; Revised May 21, 2018; Accepted June 01, 2018.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Abstract

Purpose

The health risk of women increases after menopause. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a public health center-based nutrition education program for hypertension in women older than 50 years of age.

Methods

The program included 8-week nutrition education and 8-week follow-up with keeping a health diary and nutrition counseling. The program was evaluated three times: before and after the nutrition education, and after the follow-up. The subjects were classified into hypertensives (n = 44) or normotensives (n = 71).

Results

The rate of taking antihypertensive drugs in the hypertensive group was 86.4%. The systolic blood pressure decreased in the hypertensive and normotensive groups after nutrition education (p < 0.05). The body weight (p < 0.001), BMI (p < 0.001), waist circumference (p < 0.001), and percent body fat (p < 0.01) were also decreased after nutrition education in both groups. The hypertensive group showed an increase in HDL-cholesterol level (p < 0.001) and decreases in triglycerides (p < 0.01) and LDL-cholesterol (p < 0.05) levels after completion of the program. The normotensive group also displayed significant changes in HDL-cholesterol (p < 0.001) and triglycerides (p < 0.01). The dietary habits and nutrition knowledge on sodium and hypertension were improved in both groups (p < 0.001). The total score of dietary behavior related to the sodium intake was improved in the normotensive group (p < 0.001). The total score of the high sodium dish frequency questionnaire decreased in both groups after nutrition education and completion of the program compared to that before the program. Decreases in the consumption frequencies of noodles, pot stews and stews, Kimchi, and beverages were significant. The total self-efficacy score was increased in both groups by the program (p < 0.001). In particular, the hypertensive group showed improvement in all items.

Conclusion

This public health center-based nutrition education program may contribute to the prevention and management of hypertension and chronic diseases in women over 50 years of age.

Keywords: nutrition education; blood pressure; serum lipid; sodium; dietary behavior

Figures


Fig. 1
The protocol of study
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Tables


Table 1
Brief contents of nutrition education program
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Table 2
General characteristics of the study subjects
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Table 3
Changes of blood pressure, anthropometric and biochemical measurements during the education program
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Table 4
Change of general dietary habits during the education program
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Table 5
Change of nutrition knowledge related to sodium and hypertension during the education program
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Table 6
Change of dietary behavior related to sodium intakes during the education program
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Table 7
Change of dish frequency questionnaire score during the education program
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Table 8
Change of self efficacy scores during the education program
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Notes

This research was supported by grant from Korea Health Industry Development Institute (KHIDI-Food-2010-97).

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