Journal List > J Nutr Health > v.51(1) > 1081561

J Nutr Health. 2018 Feb;51(1):73-86. Korean.
Published online February 28, 2018.  https://doi.org/10.4163/jnh.2018.51.1.73
© 2018 The Korean Nutrition Society
Designing optimized food intake patterns for Korean adults using linear programming (I): analysis of data from the 2010~2014 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
Kana Asano,1 Hongsuk Yang,2 Youngmi Lee,3 and Jihyun Yoon1,4
1Department of Food and Nutrition, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Korea.
2Department of Business Administration, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Korea.
3Department of Food and Nutrition, Myongji University, Yongin, Gyeonggi 17058, Korea.
4Research Institute of Human Ecology, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Korea.

To whom correspondence should be addressed. tel: +82-2-880-8750, Email: hoonyoon@snu.ac.kr
Received October 15, 2017; Revised November 05, 2017; Accepted January 17, 2018.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study was to design optimized food intake patterns that meet the nutritional recommendations with minimal changes from the current food intake patterns among Korean adults using linear programming.

Methods

Data of a one day 24-hour dietary recall from the 2010~2014 Korea National Health and Nutrition Survey were used to quantify the food items that Korean adults usually consumed. These food items were categorized into seven groups and 24 subgroups. The mean intakes and intake distributions of the food groups and the food subgroups were calculated for eight age (19~29, 30~49, 50~64, and over 65 years old) and gender (male and female) groups. A linear programming model was constructed to minimize the difference between the optimized and mean intakes of the food subgroups while meeting the Dietary Reference Intakes for Koreans (KDRIs) for energy and 13 nutrients, and not exceeding the typical quantities of each food subgroup consumed by the respective age and gender groups.

Results

The optimized food intake patterns, which were a set of quantities of 24 food subgroups, were obtained mathematically for eight age and gender groups. Overall, major modifications of current diet were required to increase the intake of vegetables and milk/dairy products and decrease the Kimchi intake. The optimized intake of seasonings, including salt, was calculated to be 0 g for all the age and gender groups.

Conclusion

The optimized food intake patterns designed using linear programming in this study lack feasibility because they suggest a seasoning consumption of 0 g. Modification of intake goal for sodium is needed to obtain optimized food intake patterns with improved feasibility.

Keywords: linear programming; nutritional requirements; nutrition surveys; food

Tables


Table 1
Age and gender distribution of study subjects
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Table 2
Classification of food groups and food subgroups in the study
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Table 3
The liner programming model used in the study
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Table 4
Food intake constrains applied to the linear programming models for Korean male adults
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Table 5
Food intake constrains applied to the linear programming models for Korean female adults
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Table 6
Comparison of food subgroup amounts between observed and optimized food intake patterns among Korean male adults
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Table 7
Comparison of food subgroup amounts between observed and optimized food intake patterns among Korean female adults
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Table 8
Comparison of nutrient contents between observed and optimized food intake patterns among Korean male adults
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Table 9
Comparison of nutrient contents between observed and optimized food intake patterns among Korean female adults
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