Journal List > J Nutr Health > v.51(1) > 1081560

J Nutr Health. 2018 Feb;51(1):60-72. Korean.
Published online February 28, 2018.  https://doi.org/10.4163/jnh.2018.51.1.60
© 2018 The Korean Nutrition Society
Analysis of comparisons of eating-out, dietary lifestyles, and healthy dietary competencies among middle-aged consumers according to obesity status and gender for implications of consumer education
Jong Ok Park
Department of Consumer Science, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Chungbuk 28644, Korea.

To whom correspondence should be addressed. tel: +82-43-261-2744, Email: nekoyaon@snu.ac.kr
Received November 07, 2017; Revised November 27, 2017; Accepted December 04, 2017.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to determine differences in eating-out, dietary life styles, and healthy dietary competencies among middle-aged consumers according to obesity status and gender for implications of consumer education.

Methods

Data were drawn from the 2016 Food Consumption Behavior Survey, and 3,022 subjects (mail 1,388; female 1,634) who were middle-aged adults were investigated. Analysis of variance with Scheffé test, t-test, χ2-test, and factor analysis were performed using SPSS v.24.

Results

Males showed less interest in diet than females. For both males and females, higher BMI degrees were associated with higher levels of interest in diet. For frequency, monthly average consumption expenditure, one-time cost for eating out, and drinking frequency, males showed higher levels than females. Especially for the male group, higher obesity status was associated with higher levels of eating out and drinking. Dietary lifestyles of males and females turned out to be very similar. For the male group, normal weight group was more likely to show ‘health and high quality pursuit dietary life-style’ than the other groups. For females, the normal weight group were more likely to show ‘health and high quality pursuit dietary life-style’ and ‘safety pursuit dietary life-style’ than the other groups. The level of ‘healthy dietary competence’ for females was found to be higher than that for males. For the female group, there were significant differences according to obesity status, and practice was more important than knowledge in determining a healthy dietary life.

Conclusion

For dietary life-related education for obese middle-aged consumers, it is important to emphasize less eating-out and drinking and less overeating while eating-out based on the results that eating-out, drinking, and overeating in the obesity group were significantly higher than in the normal group. It is important to focus on the value of dietary life and diverse foods, based on the results that the obesity group was less likely to be have healthy dietary lifestyles and consume less diverse foods than the normal group.

Keywords: middle-aged consumers; obesity; gender; dietary life style; healthy dietary competency

Tables


Table 1
Socio-demographic characteristics of middle-aged consumers by gender and obesity degree
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Table 2
Interest and experience of weight control of middle-aged consumers
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Table 3
Frequencies of eating-out/alcohol drinking per week and cost of eating-out of middle-aged consumers
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Table 4
Factor analysis results of dietary life style of males_rotated component matrix (N = 1,388)
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Table 5
Factor analysis results of dietary life style of females_rotated component matrix (N = 1,631)
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Table 6
Dietary life styles of middle-aged consumers
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Table 7
Healthy dietary life competence of middle-aged consumers
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