Journal List > J Nutr Health > v.51(1) > 1081559

J Nutr Health. 2018 Feb;51(1):50-59. Korean.
Published online February 28, 2018.  https://doi.org/10.4163/jnh.2018.51.1.50
© 2018 The Korean Nutrition Society
Evaluation of the meal variety with eating breakfast together as a family in Korean children: based on 2013~2015 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
Jee-Young Yeon,1 and Yun-Jung Bae2
1Department of Food and Nutrition, Seowon University, Chongju, Chungbuk 28674, Korea.
2Division of Food Science and Culinary Arts, Shinhan University, Uijeongbu, Gyeonggi 11644, Korea.

To whom correspondence should be addressed. tel: +82-31-870-3572, Email: byj@shinhan.ac.kr
Received February 01, 2018; Revised February 04, 2018; Accepted February 07, 2018.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study was to identify the nutritional status in Korean children eating breakfast together as a family or skipping breakfast from the 2013 ~ 2015 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES).

Methods

A total of 1,393 subjects (boys = 731, girls = 662), aged 6 ~ 11 years, were presented with a 24 hr-recall method, and classified according to their eating breakfast together as a family or skipping breakfast; and eating breakfast together as a family (EBF group; boys = 580, girls = 548), eating breakfast alone (EBA group; boys = 100, girls = 67), and skipping breakfast (SB group; boys = 51, girls = 47).

Results

In the boys, the SB group had a significantly lower carbohydrate (p = 0.0198) and vitamin C (p = 0.0219) density, and a higher fat (p = 0.0020) density than the EBF and EBA groups. In both boys and girls, the EBF and EBA groups showed a significantly larger number of dishes in breakfast than the SB group (p < 0.0001, respectively). In boys, the EBF group showed a significantly higher number of foods in breakfast than the EBA and SB groups (p < 0.0001).

Conclusion

Children eating breakfast together as a family may be associated with a variety of food intake than children eating breakfast alone and skipping breakfast.

Keywords: breakfast; family; skipping; nutritional status; Korean children

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