Journal List > J Nutr Health > v.50(6) > 1081537

J Nutr Health. 2017 Dec;50(6):624-644. Korean.
Published online December 31, 2017.  https://doi.org/10.4163/jnh.2017.50.6.624
© 2017 The Korean Nutrition Society
An iodine database establishment and iodine intake in Korean adults: Based on the 1998~2014 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
Yu Mi Ko,1,* Yong Seok Kwon,2,* and Yoo Kyoung Park1
1Department of Medical Nutrition, Kyunghee University, Yongin 17104, Korea.
2F&D Communication, Gyeonggi 10433, Korea.

To whom correspondence should be addressed. tel: +82-31-201-3816, Email: ypark@khu.ac.kr

*These authors contributed equally to this article.

Received September 13, 2017; Revised October 05, 2017; Accepted November 28, 2017.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Abstract

Purpose

This study analyzed iodine intake by establishing an iodine database of general Korean foods eaten by Korean adults based on the data from the 1998 ~ 2014 KNHANES (Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey).

Methods

Data on 56,818 subjects aged 19 years and older were obtained from health behavior interviews and a 24-hour dietary recall survey. Iodine intake of subjects was analyzed according to general characteristics, dietary lifestyle, food groups, and cooking method.

Results

An iodine database was established for 312 food items. The mean iodine intake of Korean adults decreased from 641.6 μg in 1998 to 236.2 μg in 2014 per day. Iodine intake of women was higher than that of men. For age distribution, those aged 30 ~ 49 years constituted more than 39 ~ 46% of subjects by survey year. Regarding iodine intake according to dietary lifestyle, the highest iodine intake was 29.4 ~ 34.4% for lunch while that of breakfast decreased. The highest iodine contribution by food group was seaweed such as kelp, sea mustard, and laver.

Conclusion

The results of this study indicate that iodine intake of Korean adults has been decreasing, and iodine intake is associated with the prevalence of thyroid disease. This study provides basic data for the estimation of iodine intake in Korean adults.

Keywords: iodine; functional food; database; KNHANES; Korean adults

Figures


Fig. 1
The flow of this study
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Tables


Table 1
The number of iodine values for food groups
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Table 2
Mean intake of dietary iodine by difference of Korean and Japanese Food Composition Database
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Table 3
The general characteristics of the subjects
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Table 4
Iodine intake by general characteristics of the subjects
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Table 5
Dietary lifestyle factors of the subjects
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Table 6
Iodine intake according to the Dietary lifestyle factors of the subjects
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Table 7
Mean & Median intake of Korean adults consuming iodine compared with Korean Dietary Reference Intakes (KDRIs)
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Table 8
Top 30 foods contributing to total iodine intake of subjects in korean adults (µg/day)
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Table 9
Iodine intake according to the food groups
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Table 10
Iodine intake according to the dish group composition
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