Journal List > J Nutr Health > v.49(5) > 1081449

J Nutr Health. 2016 Oct;49(5):269-276. Korean.
Published online October 31, 2016.  https://doi.org/10.4163/jnh.2016.49.5.269
© 2016 The Korean Nutrition Society
Dietary effect of green tea extract on hydration improvement and metabolism of free amino acid generation in epidermis of UV-irradiated hairless mice
Sumin Choi, Jihye Shin, Bomin Lee and Yunhi Cho
Department of Medical Nutrition, Graduate School of East-West Medical Science, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 17104, Korea.

To whom correspondence should be addressed. tel: +82-31-201-3817, Email: choyunhi@khu.ac.kr
Received June 10, 2016; Revised July 06, 2016; Accepted September 05, 2016.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Abstract

Purpose

Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation decreases epidermal hydration, which is maintained by reduction of natural moisturizing factors (NMFs). Among various NMFs, free amino acids (AA) are major constituents generated by filaggrin degradation. This experiment was conducted to determine whether or not dietary supplementation of green tea extract (GTE) in UV-irradiated mice can improve epidermal levels of hydration, filaggrin, free AAs, and peptidylarginine deiminase-3 (PAD3) expression (an enzyme involved in filaggrin degradation).

Methods

Hairless mice were fed a diet of 1% GTE for 10 weeks in parallel with UV irradiation (group UV+1%GTE). As controls, hairless mice were fed a control diet in parallel with (group UV+) or without (group UV-) UV irradiation.

Results

In group UV+, epidermal levels of hydration and filaggrin were lower than those in group UV-; these levels increased in group UV+1% GTE to levels similar to group UV-. Epidermal levels of PAD3 and major AAs of NMF, alanine, glycine and serine were similar in groups UV- and UV+, whereas these levels highly increased in group UV+1% GTE.

Conclusion

Dietary GTE improves epidermal hydration by filaggrin generation and degradation into AAs.

Keywords: green tea extract (GTE); filaggrin; peptidylarginine deiminase-3 (PAD3); natural moisturizing factor (NMF)

Figures


Fig. 1
Altered epidermal hydration of groups. Hairless mice fed a control diet without UV irradiation for 10 weeks (group UV-); UV-irradiated hairless mice fed a control diet (group UV+) or a diet supplemented with 1.0% green tea extract (group UV+1%GTE) for 10 weeks. Values are mean ± SD (n = 5). Values with different alphabetical letters are significantly different (p < 0.05) using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple range test.
Click for larger image


Fig. 2
Altered protein levels of profilaggrin and filaggrin in the epidermis of groups. Hairless mice fed a control diet without UV irradiation for 10 weeks (group UV-): UV-irradiated hairless mice fed a control diet (group UV+) or a diet supplemented with 1.0% green tea extract (group UV+1%GTE) for 10 weeks (A) Representative expression of profilaggrin and filaggrin proteins in the epidermis of groups (B) Signal intensities from multiple experiments of (A) were quantified and the integrated areas were normalized, first to the corresponding value of actin and then to the signal observed in the normal control group (group UV-). Values are mean ± SD (n = 5). Values with different alphabetical letters in profilaggrin and filaggrin are significantly different (p < 0.05) using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple range test.
Click for larger image


Fig. 3
Altered protein level of peptidylarginine deiminase-3 in the epidermis of groups. Hairless mice fed a control diet without UV irradiation for 10 weeks (group UV-); UV-irradiated hairless mice fed a control diet (group UV+) or a diet supplemented with 1.0% green tea extract (group UV+1%GTE) for 10 weeks (A) Representative expression of peptidylarginine deiminase-3 (PAD3) protein in the epidermis of groups (B) Signal intensities from multiple experiments of (A) were quantified and the integrated areas were normalized, first to the corresponding value of actin and then to the signal observed in the normal control group (group UV-). Values are mean ± SD (n = 5). Values with different alphabetical letters in PAD3 is significantly different (p < 0.05) using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple range test.
Click for larger image


Fig. 4
Free amino acid contents in the epidermis of groups. Hairless mice fed a control diet without UV irradiation for 10 weeks (group UV-); UV-irradiated hairless mice fed a control diet (group UV+) or a diet supplemented with 1.0% green tea extract (group UV+1%GTE) for 10 weeks. Data are mean ± SD (n = 5). Values with different alphabetical letters in each amino acids are significantly different (p < 0.05) using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s multiple range test.
Click for larger image

Tables


Table 1
Diet composition and UV irradiation of experimental groups (g/kg)
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Notes

This study was supported by a grant of the Korean Health Technology R & D Project, Ministry of Health & Welfare, Republic of Korea (Grant No. HN13C0076).

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