Journal List > J Nutr Health > v.48(6) > 1081420

J Nutr Health. 2015 Dec;48(6):488-495. Korean.
Published online December 31, 2015.  https://doi.org/10.4163/jnh.2015.48.6.488
© 2015 The Korean Nutrition Society
A Study on nutritional status and dietary quality according to carbonated drink consumption in male adolescents: Based on 2007~2009 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
Yun-Jung Bae,1 and Jee-Young Yeon2
1Division of Food Science and Culinary Arts, Shinhan University, Uijeongbu 11644, Korea.
2Department of Food and Nutrition, Seowon University, Chongju 28674, Korea.

To whom correspondence should be addressed. tel: +82-43-299-8749, Email: yeon@seowon.ac.kr
Received September 18, 2015; Revised October 29, 2015; Accepted December 08, 2015.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Abstract

Purpose

This study was conducted to evaluate nutrition intake and diet quality according to carbonated drink consumption in male adolescents (middle-school students = 480, high-school students = 417).

Methods

We analyzed data from the combined 2007~2009 KNHANES (Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey). Subjects were divided into two groups, the LCDI (low carbonated drink intake (< 1 time/week), n = 362) group and the HCDI (high carbonated drink intake (≥ 1 time/week), n = 535) group, according to carbonated beverage consumption. Nutrient and food group intake, NAR (nutrient adequacy ratio), and MAR (mean adequacy ratio) were analyzed using data from the 24-recall method.

Results

Intake of plant protein, vitamin C, plant calcium, phosphorous, and potassium was significantly lower in the HCDI group, compared with the LCDI group. Percent of RNI (recommended nutrient intake) of vitamin C and phosphorous was significantly lower in the HCDI group, compared with the LCDI group. Percentage of subjects who consumed under EAR (estimated average requirement) of protein and vitamin C was significantly higher in the HCDI group, compared with the LCDI group. The NAR of phosphorous was significantly lower in the HCDI group, compared with the LCDI group. Food intakes from potato and starches, pulses and vegetables were significantly lower in the HCDI group, compared with the LCDI group.

Conclusion

Consumption of carbonated drinks decreased the diet quality, including calcium, potassium, protein, and vitamin C. Therefore, nutrition education relating to consumption of carbonated drinks is required for male adolescents in order to maintain healthy dietary habits.

Keywords: carbonated drinks; diet quality; food and nutrition intake; male adolescents

Tables


Table 1
General characteristics of the subjects
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Table 2
Dietary habits of the subjects
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Table 3
Energy and nutrients intakes of the subjects
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Table 4
The percent of RNI1) of the subjects
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Table 5
The percent of the subjects consumed under EAR1) of the subjects
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Table 6
Nutrient adequacy ratio (NAR) and mean adequacy ratio (MAR) of the subjects
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Table 7
Food intakes from each food group in subjects
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