Journal List > J Nutr Health > v.48(6) > 1081416

J Nutr Health. 2015 Dec;48(6):459-467. Korean.
Published online December 31, 2015.  https://doi.org/10.4163/jnh.2015.48.6.459
© 2015 The Korean Nutrition Society
Comparing the anti-inflammatory effect of nanoencapsulated lycopene and lycopene on RAW 264.7 macrophage cell line
Eun Young Seo,1,** Myung Hwan Kim,2,** Woo-Kyoung Kim,3 and Moon-Jeong Chang4
1Department of Food Service Industry, Jangan University, Hwaseong 18331, Korea.
2Department of Food Technology, Dankook University, Cheonan 31116, Korea.
3Department of Food & Nutrition, Dankook University, Cheonan 31116, Korea.
4Department of Food & Nutrition, Kookmin University, Seoul 02707, Korea.

**These two authors contributed to this work equally.
To whom correspondence should be addressed. tel: +82-2-910-4776, Email: cmoon@kookmin.ac.kr

Received November 25, 2015; Revised December 07, 2015; Accepted December 14, 2015.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Abstract

Purpose

We developed a method to load lycopene into maltodextrin and cyclodextrin in an attempt to overcome the poor bioavailability and improve the anti-inflammatory effect of this polyphenol

Methods

Nanosized lycopenes were encapsulated into biodegradable amphiphillic cyclodextrin and maltodextrin molecules prepared using a high pressure homogenizer at 15,000~25,000 psi. Cell damage was induced by lipopolysaccharides (LPS) in a mouse macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7. The cells were subjected to various doses of free lycopene (FL) and nanoencapsulated lycopene (NEL). RT-PCR was used to quantify the tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and cyclooxigenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA levels, while ELISA was used to determine the protein levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6.

Results

NEL significantly reduced the mRNA expression of IL-6 and IL-1β at the highest dose, while not in cells treated with FL. In addition, NEL treatment caused a significant reduction in IL-6 and TNF-α protein levels, compared to cells treated with a similar dose of FL. In addition, mRNA expression of iNOS and COX-2 enzyme in the activated macrophages was more efficiently suppressed by NEL than by FL.

Conclusion

Overall, our results suggest that lycopene is a potential inflammation reducing agent and nanoencapsulation of lycopene can further improve its anti-inflammatory effect during tissue-damaging inflammatory conditions.

Keywords: lycopene; nanoencapsulated lycopene; anti-inflammation; RAW 264.7 cells

Figures


Fig. 1
Effect of FL or NFL on cell proliferation in Raw264.7 cells. FL: free lycopene, NEL: nanoencapsulated lycopene. Values not sharing the same purperscript letter are statistically different by Duncan's multiple range test in the same type of lycopene treatment (p < 0.05).
Click for larger image


Fig. 2
Effect of FL or NFL on IL-6 mRNA experssion and amount in Raw264.7 cells. FL: free lycopene, NEL: nanoencapsulated lycopene. Values not sharing the same purperscript letter are statistically different by Duncan's multiple range test in the same type of lycopene treatment (p < 0.05).
Click for larger image


Fig. 3
Effect of FL or NFL on IL-1β mRNA experssion and amount in Raw264.7 cells. FL: free lycopene, NEL: nanoencapsulated lycopene. Values not sharing the same purperscript letter are statistically different by Duncan's multiple range test in the same type of lycopene treatment (p < 0.05).
Click for larger image


Fig. 4
Effect of FL or NFL on TNF-α mRNA experssion and amount in Raw264.7 cells. FL: free lycopene, NEL: nanoencapsulated lycopene. Values not sharing the same purperscript letter are statistically different by Duncan's multiple range test in the same type of lycopene treatment (p < 0.05).
Click for larger image


Fig. 5
Effect of FL or NFL on iNOS and COX-2 mRNA experssion and amount in Raw264.7 cells. FL: free lycopene, NEL: nanoencapsulated lycopene. Values not sharing the same purperscript letter are statistically different by Duncan's multiple range test in the same type of lycopene treatment (p < 0.05).
Click for larger image

Tables


Table 1
Primer sequences used for Real time PCR
Click for larger image

Notes

This research was supported by 2014 Ottogi foundation research program.

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