Journal List > J Nutr Health > v.48(5) > 1081407

J Nutr Health. 2015 Oct;48(5):381-389. Korean.
Published online October 30, 2015.  https://doi.org/10.4163/jnh.2015.48.5.381
© 2015 The Korean Nutrition Society
High fructose and high fat diet increased bone volume of trabecular and cortical bone in growing female rats
Hyejin Ahn,1 SooYeon Yoo,1 and Yoo-Kyoung Park1,2
1Department of Medical Nutrition, Kyung Hee University, Gyeonggi 17104, Korea.
2Research Institute of Medical Nutrition, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 02447, Korea.

To whom correspondence should be addressed. tel: +82-31-201-3816, Email: ypark@khu.ac.kr
Received September 10, 2015; Revised September 24, 2015; Accepted October 01, 2015.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of a high fructose and fat diet on bone growth and maturation in growing female rats.

Methods

Three-week-old female SD rats were randomly assigned to four experimental groups; the control group (CON: fed control diet based on AIN-93G, n = 8); the high-fructose diet group (HFrc: fed control diet with 30% fructose, n = 8); the high-fat diet group (Hfat: fed control diet with 45 kcal% fat, n = 8); and the high-fat diet plus high fructose group (HFrc + HFat: fed diets 45 kcal% fat with 30% fructose, n = 8). Each group was assigned their respective diets for the remaining eight weeks. Bone-related parameters (bone mineral density (BMD) and structural parameters, osteocalcin (OC), deoxypyridinoline (DPD)) and morphologic changes of kidney were analyzed at the end of the experiment.

Results

Final body weights and weight gain were higher in the HFat and HFrc + HFat groups and showed higher tendency in the HFrc group compared with those of the CON group (p < 0.05); however, no significant difference in caloric intake was observed among the four experimental groups. The serum OC levels of the HFrc and HFrc + HFat groups were lower than those of the CON and HFat groups (p < 0.05). Urinary levels of DPD did not differ among the experimental groups. BV/TV and Tb.N of trabecular bone were higher in the HFrc + HFat group and showed a higher tendency in the HFrc group than those of the CON and HFat groups (p < 0.05). Tb.Pf of trabecular bone were lower in the HFrc + HFat group than those in the CON and HFat groups (p < 0.05). However, no difference in trabecular BMD was observed among the experimental groups. Cortical bone volume was higher in the HFat and HFrc + HFat groups than in the CON and HFrc groups (p < 0.05). No morphology change in kidney was observed among the experimental groups.

Conclusion

Our study suggests that 8 weeks of high-fructose and high fat intake could improve the bone quality (Structural parameters) of trabecular and cortical bone of tibia in growing female rats.

Keywords: high-fructose diet; high-fat diet; kidney function; bone growth; growing rats

Figures


Fig. 1
Changes of body weight of experimental groups during 8 weeks. CON: rats received control-diet based on AIN-93G (4.0 kcal/g diet), HFrc: rats received 30% fructose-diet based on control-diet (4.0 kcal/g diet), HFat: rats received 45 kcal% fat-diet (4.8 kcal/g diet), HFrc + HFat: rats received 45 kcal% fat-diet with 30% fructose (4.8 kcal/g diet)
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Fig. 2
Photomicrograph of glomerulus in the experimental groups taken at 8 weeks, pertaining to the respective groups (A: CON, B: HFrc, C: HFat, D: HFrc + HFat). All experimental groups showed normal glomeruli and tubules. H&E stained glomeruli ×400. Magnification bars 40 µm. CON: rats received control-diet based on AIN-93G (4.0 kcal/g diet), HFrc: rats received 30% fructose-diet based on controldiet (4.0 kcal/g diet), HFat: rats received45 kcal% fat-diet (4.8 kcal/g diet), HFrc + HFat: rats received 45 kcal% fat-diet with 30% fructose (4.8 kcal/g diet)
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Fig. 3
Representative 3D images of trabecular bone (right tibia)taken at 8 weeks, pertaining to the respective groups (A: CON, B: HFrc, C: HFat, D: HFrc + HFat), obtained with in vivo micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Changes in structural parameters (BV/TV, BS/BV, Tb.Th, Tb.Sp, Tb.N, Tb.Pf, SMI and BMD) of trabecular bone over eight weeks were quantified and shown in Table 3. CON: rats received control-diet based on AIN-93G (4.0 kcal/g diet), HFrc: rats received 30% fructose-diet based on control-diet (4.0 kcal/g diet), HFat: rats received45 kcal% fat-diet (4.8 kcal/g diet), HFrc + HFat: rats received 45 kcal% fat-diet with 30% fructose (4.8 kcal/g diet)
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Tables


Table 1
Ingredient composition of experimental diets
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Table 2
Serum and urinary levels of bone biomarkers
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Table 3
Architectural and mineralization parameters of the experimental groups
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Notes

This work was carried out with the support of "Cooperative Research Program for Agriculture Science & Technology Development (project No. 00982602)" Rural Development Administration, Republic of Korea.

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