Journal List > J Nutr Health > v.48(3) > 1081393

J Nutr Health. 2015 Jun;48(3):258-268. Korean.
Published online June 30, 2015.  https://doi.org/10.4163/jnh.2015.48.3.258
© 2015 The Korean Nutrition Society
The relationship of ready-to-eat cereal consumption with nutrition and health status in the Korean population based on the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2012
Chin-Eun Chung
Department of Food and Nutrition, Ansan University, Gyeonggi 426-701, Korea.

To whom correspondence should be addressed. tel: +82-10-4224-7599, Email: cechung@ansan.ac.kr
Received May 07, 2015; Revised June 01, 2015; Accepted June 08, 2015.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study was to explore the relationship of ready-to-eat cereal (RTEC) consumption with nutrition and health status. Examination of health status for this project included obesity, abdominal obesity, hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, low-HDL-cholesterolemia, diabetes, anemia, and metabolic syndrome.

Methods

Two groups, RTEC consumers and those who did not consume RTEC, were identified using 24-hour dietary recall data from the 2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES). Nutritional intakes and risk factors of the two groups were compared using covariates-adjusted statistical procedures. Statistical analyses were performed using SAS survey procedures, and strata, cluster, and weight were considered. Subjects of analysis of nutritional intake were between the ages of 1 and 75, and those considered in the risk factor analysis were between the ages of 19 and 75.

Results

Results showed that 3.8% of the Korean population was RTEC consumers. Compared to the subjects who did not intake RTEC, RTEC consumers exhibited significantly higher intakes of calcium, thiamin, riboflavin, and vitamin C. It was also discovered that the percentage of people whose intakes were less than EAR decreased with RTEC consumption. RTEC consumption showed significant association with decreased systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, serum triglyceride, and serum total cholesterol. Consequently, prevalence of hypertension among RTEC consumers was significantly lower than that among non-consumers, and the odds ratio for hypertension was 0.19 after adjusting the models for covariates.

Conclusion

Results of this study clearly suggest an association of RTEC consumption with improved nutritional status and cardiometabolic risk profile in Korean adults. Conduct of additional studies will be necessary in order to determine the nature of these relationships.

Keywords: Ready-to-eat cereal (RTEC); Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES); disease prevalence; cardiometabolic risk factors

Tables


Table 1
Daily ready-to-eat cereal (RTEC) consumption by gender and age group, KNHANES 2012
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Table 2
Daily nutrient intakes by Ready-to-eat cereal (RTEC) consumption for 1~18 and 19~75 years of age, KNHANES 2012
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Table 3
Percentage of people whose intakes are less than EAR by Ready-to-eat cereal (RTEC) consumption, for 1~18 and 19~75 years of age, KNHANES 2012 (%)
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Table 4
Percentage of people whose intakes are over UL by Ready-to-eat cereal (RTEC) consumption, for 1~18 and 19~75 years of age, KNHANES 2012 (%)
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Table 5
Demographic characteristics by ready-to-eat cereal (RTEC) consumption: for 19~75 years of age, KNHANES 2012
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Table 6
Anthropometric and other cardiometabolic risk factors by Ready-to-eat cereal (RTEC) consumption for 19~75 years of age, KNHANES 2012
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Table 7
Prevalence of chronic diseases by Ready-to-eat cereal (RTEC) consumption and Odds Ratio (and 95% confidence interval) for 19~75 years of age, KNHANES 2012
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