Journal List > J Nutr Health > v.47(6) > 1081366

J Nutr Health. 2014 Dec;47(6):452-462. Korean.
Published online December 31, 2014.  https://doi.org/10.4163/jnh.2014.47.6.452
© 2014 The Korean Nutrition Society
Comparative analysis on status of events and importance-performance analysis (IPA) between industry and school foodservices
Hyun Jin Song,1 and Jeong Ok Rho2
1Major of Nutrition Education, The Graduate School of Education, Chonbuk National University, Jenju, Jeonbuk 561-756, Korea.
2Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Chonbuk National University, Jenju, Jeonbuk 561-756, Korea.

To whom correspondence should be addressed. tel: +82-63-270-4135, Email: jorho@jbnu.ac.kr
Received August 19, 2014; Revised September 29, 2014; Accepted November 04, 2014.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study was to evaluate the status of events and importance-performance analysis (IPA) between industry and school foodservices.

Methods

The study subjects were dietitians in industry foodservices (n = 73) and nutrition teachers in school foodservices (n = 135) in the Jeonbuk area. Demographic characteristics, status of events, and problems of implementing events were assessed using a self-administered questionnaire.

Results

Approximately 67% of industry foodservices had implemented an event a month, whereas 40.7% of school foodservices did not implement events for students. The type of events that industry and school foodservices had implemented most frequently were Sambok event, Dongji event, Daeboreum event, Spring-Namul event, and Chuseok event. The industry foodservices had significantly higher average scores for performance of events than those of the school foodservices (p < 0.001). In the Importance-Performance Analysis (IPA), high importance and high performance (A area: doing great) in industry foodservices were seasonal events, traditional festival day events, anniversary events, traditional seasonal events, and personal memory events, whereas in school foodservices were traditional festival day events, traditional seasonal events, school events, and environment events.

Conclusion

These results showed that events are important for the increase in customer satisfaction. Therefore, it is necessary to consider educational programs on event implementation for dietitians and employees in industry and school foodservices.

Keywords: foodservices; event; importance; performance

Figures


Fig. 1
Importance and performance analysis of event at industry foodservices
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Fig. 2
Importance and performance analysis of event at school foodservices
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Tables


Table 1
General characteristics of the subjects
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Table 2
General characteristics of food systems
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Table 3
Frequence of events
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Table 4
Promotion method of events
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Table 5
Kind of events at industry and school foodservices
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Table 6
Independent-samples T test of importance and performance of event in industry and school foodservices
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Table 7
Paired-samples T test of importance and performance of event in industry and school foodservices
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Table 8
Effect and hindrance of event at the foodservices
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