Journal List > J Nutr Health > v.47(1) > 1081365

J Nutr Health. 2014 Feb;47(1):45-50. Korean.
Published online February 28, 2014.  https://doi.org/10.4163/jnh.2014.47.1.45
© 2014 The Korean Nutrition Society
Systematic review of the effect of dried ginger powder on improvement of nausea and vomiting associated with early pregnancy or motion sickness
Jin Sook Kwak,1,4 Ju Eun Paek,1,4 Sewon Jeong,2 Joohee Kim,2 Ji Yeon Kim,3 and Oran Kwon2,4
1Biofood CRO Co., Ltd., Seoul 120-160, Korea.
2Biofood Network Center, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750, Korea.
3Department of Food Science and Technology, Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul 139-743, Korea.
4Department of Nutritional Science and Food Management, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750, Korea.

To whom correspondence should be addressed. tel: +82-2-3277-6860, Email: orank@ewha.ac.kr
Received November 19, 2013; Revised December 03, 2013; Accepted January 06, 2014.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Abstract

Purpose

Ginger (Zingiber officinale) has been widely used as an antiemetic agent. This systematic review was aimed at evaluation of the effect of dried ginger powder supplementation on improvement of nausea and vomiting associated with early pregnancy or motion sickness.

Methods

We searched Pubmed, Cochrane, Science Direct, and KISS (Korean studies Information Service System) using keywords such as ginger or Zingiber officinale in combination with nausea, vomiting, motion sickness, or pregnancy, published in March 2013.

Results

The strength of the evidence was evaluated on the selected 12 RCTs (randomized controlled trials). Eleven trials including 2,630 subjects showed that supplementation with dried ginger powder resulted in significant improvement of nausea or vomiting related to early pregnancy or motion sickness. Among the nine studies including 809 women in early pregnancy before 20 weeks of gestation, ginger supplementation was superior to placebo in five studies (n = 305), and as effective as positive control (vitamin B6 or dimenhydrinate) in four studies (n = 504). Ginger intake significantly reduced the episodes or severity of vomiting related to motion sickness compared to placebo or showed the same effect as several antiemetic drugs in two studies (n = 1,821).

Conclusion

Our findings added evidence indicating that ginger powder supplements might improve the symptoms of nausea or vomiting related to early pregnancy or motion sickness without significant adverse events.

Keywords: systematic review; Zingiber officinale; morning sickness; motion sickness

Figures


Fig. 1
Flow diagram of included and excluded studies.
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Fig. 2
Evidence table of systematic review for ginger dried powder and effects on the improvement of nausea and vomiting associated with early pregnancy or motion sickness; significant improvement in nausea and vomiting; no significant improvement in nausea and vomiting. The circle area is proportional to the subject number.
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Tables


Table 1
Characteristics of studies included for systematic review
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Notes

This work was supported by the Rural Development Administration in 2013 (PJ0084502013).

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