Journal List > J Nutr Health > v.46(6) > 1081315

J Nutr Health. 2013 Dec;46(6):493-502. Korean.
Published online December 31, 2013.  https://doi.org/10.4163/jnh.2013.46.6.493
© 2013 The Korean Nutrition Society
Effect of fermented soybean curd residue (FSCR; SCR-meju) by aspergillus oryzae on the anti-obesity and lipids improvement
Sang-Il Lee,1 Ye-Kyung Lee,2 Soon-Dong Kim,2 Ji-Ean Lee,2 Jongkeun Choi,3 Jong-Phil Bak,2 Jong-Hwan Lim,2 Joo-Won Suh,2 and In-Ae Lee2
1Department of Food, Nutrition and Culinary Arts, Keimyung College, Daegu 704-703, Korea.
2Center for Nutraceutical and Pharmaceutical Materials, Myongji University, Yongin 449-728, Korea.
3Department of Cosmetic Science, Chungwoon University, Hongseong 350-701, Korea.

To whom correspondence should be addressed. (Email: rheeinae@hanmail.net )
Received September 02, 2013; Revised October 22, 2013; Accepted November 20, 2013.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Abstract

In this study, we designed to confirm the dietary effect of anti-obesity of fermented soybean curd residue (FSCR; SCR-Meju; Biji-meju) by A. oryzae, which is well known as a Korean traditional meju microbe. We observed that body weight gain, serum and hepatic lipid profile, as well as the activity of ROS generating enzyme and ROS scavenging enzyme in high-fat diet induced obese mice fed experimental diet (SCR and SCR-meju). Body weight gain and epididymal fat weight of HC (high-fat diet control) was markedly higher than that of NC (Normal control). Conversely, body weight gain and epididymal fat weight of the SCR (Biji) and SCR-meju (Biji-meju) group was significantly lower than that of HC; these of the SCR-meju group was lower than that of the SCR group. Furthermore, serum TG and total-cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol contents of SCR and SCR-meju groups were lower than that of HC, and HDL-cholesterol level of the SCR-meju group was significantly higher than that of HC. In conclusion, although precise mechanisms of the antiobese effects of SCR-meju in this study are unknown, the present study provides an experimental evidence that SCR-meju may prevent obesity and obesity related metabolic syndromes, such as hyperlipidemia, hypertension and diabetes, and liver disease by high-fat diet. Nevertheless, further study in this filed will be needed.

Keywords: soybean curd residue (SCR, biji); aspergillus oryzae; SCR-meju (biji-meju); anit-obesity; antioxidant enzymes

Figures


Fig. 1
Preparation procedure of fermented soybean curd residue (SCR-meju).
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Fig. 2
Effects of SCR and SCR-meju supplemented high fat diets on the changes in body weight gain (% against initial) of mouse fed for 8 weeks. See Fig. 1 and Table 1. Values are means (n = 6), and the values of the final week are mean ± standard deviations (n = 6). Different superscripts on the final week indicate significant differences (p < 0.05).
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Fig. 3
Effects of FSCR supplemented diets on the weight of fat around epididymis in mouse fed for 8 weeks. See Table 1. Values are mean ± standard deviations (n = 5), different superscripts in the figures indicates significant differences (p < 0.05).
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Fig. 4
Effects of SCR and SCR-meju supplemented high fat diets on the content of hepatic TG and TC in mouse fed for 8 weeks. See Table 1. Values are mean ± standard deviations (n = 5), different superscripts in the figures indicates significant differences (p < 0.05).
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Fig. 5
Effects of SCR and SCR-meju supplemented high fat diets on the content of glutathione total lipid peroxide in mouse fed for 8 weeks. See Table 1. Values are mean ± standard deviations (n = 5), different superscripts in the figures indicates significant differences (p < 0.05).
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Fig. 6
Effects of SCR and SCR-meju supplemented high fat diets on the serum ALT activity in mouse fed for 8 weeks. See Table 1. Values are mean ± standard deviations (n = 5), different superscripts in the figures indicates significant differences (p < 0.05).
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Fig. 7
Effects of SCR and SCR-meju supplemented high fat diets on the activities of XO, SOD, GPX and GST in liver of mouse fed for 8 weeks. See Table 1. Values are mean ± standard deviations (n = 5), different superscripts in the figures indicates significant differences (p < 0.05).
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Fig. 8
Light microscopic photographs of liver tissue (bar: 25 µm) of mouse fed with experimental diets for 8 weeks (HE stain). The hepatocytes in HC group are distended by accumulation of multiple fat droplets and sinusoids are occluded (arrow).
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Tables


Table 1
Experimental groups and ingredients of diets (%)
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Table 2
Effects of SCR and SCR-meju supplemented high fat diets on body weight gain and feed efficiency ratio of mouse fed for 8 weeks
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Table 3
Effects of SCR and SCR-meju supplemented high fat diets on organs weight of mouse fed for 8 weeks (relative % of body weight)
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Table 4
Effects of SCR and SCR-meju supplemented high fat diets on the content of serum lipid profiles in mouse fed for 8 weeks
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Notes

This work was supported by a grant from the Next-Generation BioGreen 21 Program (No. PJ009582 & PJ009643), Rural Development Administration, Republic of Korea.

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