Journal List > J Nutr Health > v.46(4) > 1081305

J Nutr Health. 2013 Aug;46(4):382-390. Korean.
Published online August 31, 2013.  https://doi.org/10.4163/jnh.2013.46.4.382
© 2013 The Korean Nutrition Society
The total sugar and free sugar content in beverages categorized according to recipes at coffee and beverage stores
Jee-Young Yeon,1 Soon-Kyu Lee,1 Ki-Yong Shin,1 Kwang-Il Kwon,2 Woo Young Lee,1 Baeg-Won Kang,1 and Hye-Kyung Park3
1Nutrition Safety Policy Division, Food Nutrition and Dietary Safety Bureau, Ministry of Food and Drug Safety, Cheongwon-gun 363-700, Korea.
2Children's Dietary Life Safety Division, Food Nutrition and Dietary Safety Bureau, Ministry of Food and Drug Safety, Cheongwon-gun 363-700, Korea.
3Food Nutrition and Dietary Safety Bureau, Ministry of Food and Drug Safety, Cheongwon-gun 363-700, Korea.

To whom correspondence should be addressed. (Email: phkfda@korea.kr )
Received May 28, 2013; Revised June 15, 2013; Accepted August 13, 2013.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Abstract

This study was designed to investigate the amount of free sugar according to each beverage category in coffee and beverage stores. The groups were categorized as 15 groups based on the kind of beverage material. The beverage groups contributing to total sugar per 100 mL were milk + syrup or powder, hot (12.9 g), ade (12.6 g), milk + syrup or powder + crushed ice (11.9 g), and espresso shot + milk + syrup + crushed ice (11.4 g). The beverage groups contributing to free sugar per 100 mL were ade (12.6 g), milk + syrup or powder + crushed ice (10.8 g), espresso shot + milk + syrup + crushed ice (10.3 g), and milk + syrup or powder, hot (9.7 g). The beverage groups contributing to total sugar (energy) per portion size were milk + syrup or powder + crushed ice 56.6 g (332.3 kcal), espresso shot + milk + syrup + crushed ice 49.3 g (333.4 kcal), milk + syrup or powder, hot 46.3 g (372.1 kcal), and milk + syrup or powder, ice 38.1 g (325.9 kcal). The beverage groups contributing to free sugar per portion size were milk + syrup or powder + crushed ice 51.2 g, espresso shot + milk + syrup + crushed ice 44.9 g, ade 37.1 g, milk + syrup or powder, hot 34.6 g, and milk + syrup or powder, ice 30.1 g. The percent of average free sugar per portion size of the WHO recommendation (free sugars <10% of total energy; <50 g/2,000 kcal) was milk + syrup or powder + crushed ice 102.4%, espresso shot + milk + syrup + crushed ice 89.8%, ade 74.1%, and milk + syrup or powder, hot 69.2%. The proportion of beverage in excess of WHO recommendation per portion size was 14.6% in espresso shot + milk + syrup + crushed ice, 22.7% in ade, and 10.9% in milk + syrup or powder, hot. Therefore, in coffee and beverage stores, menu development with reduced sugar content is needed, and nutrition information should be provided through sugar nutrition labeling.

Keywords: total sugar; free sugar; beverage; coffee

Figures


Fig. 1
Distribution of free sugar contents of beverages according to beverage stores within each beverage category. A: Espresso Shot + Milk + Syrup or power, Hot. B: Espresso Shot + Milk + Syrup or power, Ice. C: Espresso Shot + Milk + Syrup + Crushed ice. D: Milk + Syrup or power, Hot. E: Milk + Syrup or power, Ice. F: Milk + Syrup or power + Crushed ice. G: Ice tea.
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Fig. 2
The percent of mean free sugar amount of more than 50 g per portion size according to ingredients of beverages and being served hot or cold. E: Espresso Shot, T: Tea, T + M: Tea + Milk, E + M, H: Espresso Shot + Milk, Hot, E + M, I: Espresso Shot + Milk, Ice, E + W (IC): Espresso Shot + Whipped cream or Ice cream, E + M + S (P), H: Espresso Shot + Milk + Syrup or powder, Hot, E + M + S (P), I: Espresso Shot + Milk + Syrup or powder, Ice, E + M + S + CI: Espresso Shot + Milk + Syrup + Crushed ice, M + S(P), H: Milk + Syrup or powder, Hot, M + S (P), I: Milk + Syrup or powder, Ice, M + S (P) + CI: Milk + Syrup or powder + Crushed Ice, FJ: Fruit juice, A: Ade, IT: Ice tea.
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Tables


Table 1
Beverage categories according to ingredients of beverages and being served hot or cold
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Table 2
The amount of energy, total sugar and free sugar per 100 mL
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Table 3
The amount of energy, total sugar and free sugar per portion size of beverage
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Table 4
Distribution (percentiles) of free sugar of per portion size
Click for larger image

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