Journal List > Korean J Nutr > v.45(2) > 1043917

Korean J Nutr. 2012 Apr;45(2):113-120. Korean.
Published online April 27, 2012.  https://doi.org/10.4163/kjn.2012.45.2.113
© 2012 The Korean Nutrition Society
Dietary effect of silk protein on epidermal levels of free sphingoid bases and phosphate metabolites in NC/Nga mice
Youngae Kim,1, Eun-hwa Song,1, Kyoungoh Shin,2 Yongmoon Lee,2 and Yunhi Cho1
1Department of Medical Nutrition, Graduate School of East-West Medical Science, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 449-701, Korea.
2College of Pharmacy, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763, Korea.

To whom correspondence should be addressed. (Email: choyunhi@khu.ac.kr )

These authors contributed egually to this work.

Received December 14, 2011; Revised January 03, 2012; Accepted February 09, 2012.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Abstract

In our previous studies, dietary supplements of silk protein, sericin, and fibroin, were beneficial for improving epidermal levels of ceramides, which are the major lipids for maintaining the epidermal barrier. In this study, we investigated the dietary effects of silk protein on epidermal levels of free sphingoid bases and their phosphates such as C18 sphingosine (So), C18 sphinganine (Sa), C18 sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), and C18 sphinganine-1-phosphate (Sa1P), which are either synthetic substrate or degradative metabolites of ceramides. Forty-five male NC/Nga mice, an animal model of atopic dermatitis (AD), were divided into three groups: group CA was an atopic control and fed a control diet, group S was fed a 1% sericin diet, and group F was fed a 1% fibroin diet. Fifteen male BALB/c mice served as group C (control group) and were fed the control diet. All mice were fed with diets and water ad libitum for 10 weeks. Sa in group CA was lower than that in group C, but So in group CA was similar to that in group C. So and Sa were higher in groups S and F than those in group CA; So level was even higher than that in group C, and Sa level was similar to that of group C. The So/Sa ratio in group CA, which is reported to increase in AD, was significantly higher than that of group C. The So/Sa ratio was lower in groups S and F than that in group CA, and decreased further in group F. However, S1P and Sa1P in groups S and F were similar to those in group CA. Taken together, we demonstrated that silk protein, sericin and fibroin dietary supplements, increased So and Sa levels, and decreased the So/Sa ratio.

Keywords: silk protein; sphingosine; sphinganine; NC/Nga mice; atopic dermatitis

Figures


Fig. 1
Levels of C18 Sphingoid bases in the epidermis of mice. C: BALB/c mice were fed with a control diet, group CA, S and F: NC/Nga mice were fed with a control diet (group CA) or diets containing 1% sericin extract (group S) or 1% fibroin extract (group F) for 10 weeks. Sphingoid bases were extracted from epidermal homogenates of each groups and analyzed using HPLC. Values are presented as Means ± SEM (n = 10). Means with different alphabetical letters are significantly different according to duncan's multiple comparison at p < 0.05.
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Fig. 2
Ratio of C18So/Sa in the epidermis of mice. Group C: BALB/c mice were fed with a control diet, group CA, S and F: NC/Nga mice were fed with a control diet (group CA) or diets containing 1% sericin extract (group S) or 1% fibroin extract (group F) for 10 weeks. Values are presented as Means ± SEM (n = 10). Means with different alphabetical letters are significantly different according to duncan's multiple range test at p < 0.05.
Click for larger image


Fig. 3
Levels of C18 Sphingoidbase-1-phosphates in the epidermis of mice. Group C: BALB/c mice were fed with a control diet, group CA. S and F: NC/Nga mice were fed with a control diet (group CA) or diets containing 1% sericin extract (group S) or 1% fibroin extract (group F) for 10 weeks. Sphingoid base-1-phosphates of epidermal homogenates were first dephosphorylated by alkaline phosphatase at 37℃ then separated sphingoid bases were extracted and analyzed using HPLC. Values are presented as means ± SEM (n = 10). Means with different alphabetical letters are significantly different according to duncan's multiple range test at p < 0.05.
Click for larger image

Tables


Table 1
Composition of experimental diets (g/kg dry diet)
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Table 2
Weight gain, food intake and FER of groups for 10 weeks
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Notes

This study was supported by a grant of the National Research Foundation (2010-0016554) in Republic of Korea.

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