Journal List > Korean J Nutr > v.44(6) > 1043910

Korean J Nutr. 2011 Dec;44(6):537-550. Korean.
Published online December 31, 2011.  https://doi.org/10.4163/kjn.2011.44.6.537
© 2011 The Korean Nutrition Society
Dietary Behavior Related to Salty Food Intake of Adults Living in a Rural Area according to Saline Sensitivity
Mi-Kyoung Kim, Jang-Il Han and Young-Jin Chung
Department of Food and Nutrition, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764, Korea.

To whom correspondence should be addressed. (Email: yjchung@cnu.ac.kr )
Received August 23, 2011; Revised September 14, 2011; Accepted November 21, 2011.

Abstract

This study was conducted to identify behavioral characteristics of salty food intake according to saline sensitivity of adults living in a rural area. Anthropometry and blood pressure were measured and salt intake-related dietary behavior was surveyed by questionnaires through interviews with 402 subjects aged ≥ 40 years in Chungcheongbuk-Do, Korea. The percentages of overweight and obese among the subjects were 37.8% and 3.8% respectively. Mean blood pressure of the subjects was in the normal range, but the distribution of subjects who were normotensive, high normal, and hypertensive was 48.7%, 17.7%, and 33.6% respectively. Approximately 27% of all subjects habitually consumed salty food, which was the smallest group, followed by 38.1% normal and 35.1% not-salty food. However, 34.6% of the eldest group of ≥ 65 years consumed salty food. The saline insensitive group showed a higher percentage of irregular meals, overeating, speed-eating, an unbalanced diet, a preference for fried food, and habitual intake of salty foods. These subjects recognized the risk for eating salty food, but they lacked the will to reduce their salty food intake. Compared to spouses and family members, experts such as doctors, nurses, and dieticians were the most influential for reducing the salty food intake of subjects. Saline sensitive group had relatively better control over salty food intake at every meal, eating out, and even when eating salty food that the spouse preferred. The saline sensitive group ate more frequently vegetables and fruits, whereas the saline insensitive group ate more frequently hot spicy foods. In conclusion, the results suggest that it is necessary to establish a social atmosphere toward reducing salt intake at the level of the government and food industry and to set action plans to be available for nutrition education programs to reduce salt intake nationwide.

Keywords: salty food intake; dietary behavior; adult; rural area; saline-sensitivity

Tables


Table 1
General characteristics of the subjects by sex
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Table 2
Anthropometric characteristics and blood pressure of the subjects by age
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Table 3
Eating behavior related to salty food intake of the subjects by age
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Table 4
Sensory response on 1% saline solution of the subjects by age
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Table 5
Distribution of blood pressures of three groups by saline sensitivity
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Table 6
Dietary behaviors of three groups by saline sensitivity
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Table 7
Behavioral belief and self appraisal about salty food intake of three groups by saline sensitivity
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Table 8
Supports and influences by the family members or experts of three groups by saline sensitivity
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Table 9
Perceived control against salty food intake of three groups by saline sensitivity
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Table 10
Monthly intake frequency of major food and some specific food groups by saline sensitivity
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