Journal List > Korean J Nutr > v.43(6) > 1043856

Korean J Nutr. 2010 Dec;43(6):597-606. Korean.
Published online December 31, 2010.  https://doi.org/10.4163/kjn.2010.43.6.597
© 2010 The Korean Nutrition Society
The Effect of Nutrition Education on the Improvement of Psychosocial Factors Related to Vegetable and Fruit Intake of Elementary School Children in Pre-Action Stages
Yoonsuk Suh and Young-Jin Chung
Department of Food and Nutrition, College of Human Ecology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764, Korea.

To whom correspondence should be addressed. (Email: yjchung@cnu.ac.kr )
Received August 25, 2010; Revised October 14, 2010; Accepted November 05, 2010.

Abstract

This study investigates the change of level of psychosocial factors of decisional balance, processes of change, and self-efficacy after nutrition education on vegetable and fruit intake of children in pre-action stages. Forty-seven 5th grade elementary school children in Yeongi-Gun, Chungnam-Do were categorized into pre-action stages from a total of 71 children by four-stage questions, and then finally into two stages of precontemplation and contemplation & preparation. After 6 weeks nutrition education, recognition of both of pros and cons of vegetable intake were improved in the two groups of precontemplation and contemplation & preparation. In fruits intake, however, recognition of pros was not changed after nutrition education in either stage, but recognition of cons was improved only in the precontemplation stage. However, no difference in any psychosocial variables was found between precontemplation stage and contemplation & preparation stage. After the nutrition education, the score of consciousness raising of vegetable intake belonging to cognitive process of change increased in the subjects of the precontemplation stage, wheres the scores of dramatic relief, self-reevaluation, environment reevaluation and social liberation increased in the group of contemplation & preparation. In fruit intake, however, no change was found except in the environment reevaluation in the precontemplation group. The behavioral process of change of vegetable and fruit intake did not show any change in either group after nutrition education. Self-efficacy scores of vegetable intake of keeping the foods at hand, eating the recommended number of servings and making time to eat increased in the precontemplation group, while in the contemplation & preparation group, self efficacy scores of shopping for a variety of vegetables, instead of keeping the foods at hands, as well as the scores of the rest two items of eating the recommended number of servings and making time to eat increased after nutrition education. However, in case of fruits intake, no difference was shown in the precontemplation stage except an item of keeping the foods at hand. The results indicated that the stage of change was progressed in the pre-action stage after nutrition education and the scores of many psychosocial factors increased in both pre-action stages. It is suggested that the recognition of cons as well as the cognitive process of change and self-efficacy could be best used as indicators of the assessment of nutrition education program for vegetable intake.

Keywords: nutrition education; stage of change; vegetables and fruits intake; psychosocial factors; elementary school children

Tables


Table 1
Distribution of stage of change of the subjects after 6 weeks nutrition education on vegetable and fruit intake N (%)
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Table 2
The general characteristics of the subjects of precontemplation stages & contemplation and preparation stage before nutrition education
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Table 3
Pros and cons of the two stages of initial and after nutrition education on vegetable and fruit intake
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Table 4
Cognitive process and behavioral process of two stages of change of initial and after nutrition education on vegetable intake
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Table 5
Cognitive process and behavioral process of two stages of change of initial and after nutrition education on fruit intake
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Table 6
Self-efficacy of two stages of change of initial and after nutrition education on vegetable intake
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Table 7
Self-efficacy of two stages of change of initial and after nutrition education on fruit intake
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