Journal List > Korean J Nutr > v.42(2) > 1043748

Kang, Jung, and Paik: Analysis of Foods and Nutrients Intake Obtained at the Final Probing Step in 24-hour Recall Method

Abstract

This study was conducted to examine the usefulness of adding final probing step (step3) in dietary assessment by 24-hour recall method among Korean adults. One-hundred fifty five adults (37 males and 118 females) above 30 years of age who visited hospitals for health examination were recruited at three hospitals in Korea. One day dietary intake was obtained using 24-hour recall method from each subject. Dietary interview was conducted in 3 steps, (1) quick list of foods eaten during the previous day, (2) detailed information of all the foods eaten, (3) the final probing for any items forgotten. Items added at the step3 were identified and contributions of energy and nutrient intakes were calculated. The average duration of interview was 10.5 min, and time spent for each step was 4.12 minute for step 1, 5.62 minute for step 2, and 38 second for step 3. The average number of dishes reported by the subjects added at the step 3 was 2.2. (Males = 2.6, Females = 1.6) Frequently reported dishes in the step 3 were Beverage, Tea, alcohol (37.1%) and Fruits (31.8%). From mean total energy intake of 1,589 kcal (Men = 1,846 kcal, Women = 1,509 kcal), 179 kcal (11.3%) was added at the step 3. In the step 3, nutrient intakes increased significantly except retinol in total subjects and except retinol and cholesterol in males but all nutrients increased significantly in females. The final probing step can add significant information on intakes of foods and many nutrients with only about 38 seconds of interview time. Confirmation of the results with larger samples of different age groups is needed.

Figures and Tables

Table 1
General characteristics of study subjects and interview time of key steps (Mean±SD)
kjn-42-158-i001

*: Difference between the two sex groups is significant by Student's t-test (p < 0.05)

Table 2
Contribution of dishes reported in the final probing step by dish group
kjn-42-158-i002

1) Final probing step

2) % of Total No. of items

Table 3
The reported dishes in the final probing step
kjn-42-158-i003
Table 4
Contribution of food items reported in the final probing step by food group
kjn-42-158-i004

1) Final probing step

2) % of Total No. of items

Table 5
Mean nutrient intakes of before and after the final probing step (a) Total Subjects
kjn-42-158-i005

1) Final Probing step

Values are means ± SD and Significantly different between before FPS and Total intakes by paired t-test (*: p < 0.05, **: p < 0.01, ***: p < 0.001)

Table 5
Mean nutrient intakes of before and after the final probing step (b) Male
kjn-42-158-i006

1) Final Probing step

Values are means ± SD and Significantly different between before FPS and Total intakes by paired t-test (*: p < 0.05, **: p < 0.01, ***: p < 0.001)

Table 5
Mean nutrient intakes of before and after the final probing step (c) Female
kjn-42-158-i007

1) Final Probing step

Values are means ± SD and Significantly different between before FPS and Total intakes by paired t-test (*: p < 0.05, **: p < 0.01, ***: p < 0.001)

Table 6
The correlation coefficients of nutrient intakes of before and after the final probing step
kjn-42-158-i008

***All values are significantly correlated between before Final probing step and After at p < 0.0001

1) Pearson correlation coefficient

2) Spearman correlation coefficient

Notes

This study was supported by a grant of the Korean Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2007-E00034-00).

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