Journal List > Korean J Community Nutr > v.21(5) > 1038559

Park and Park: Factors Affecting the Frequency of Skipping Meals of Prime-Aged Mothers with Children : Data from the Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2010-2011

Abstract

Objectives

This study was designed with the goal of understanding the factors affecting the frequency of skipping meals of prime-aged mothers with children as well as their nutritional status.

Methods

Utilizing data from the 2010-2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Survey, the frequency of skipping meals of mothers aged between 30 to 49 years with children aged between 3 to 11 years during a two day period was statistically analyzed. The number of meals skipped calculated and categorized into skipping no meals, skipping one meal, skipping two meals or more.

Results

Compared to subjects who corresponded to mean nutrient adequacy ratio(MAR) of 4 quartile, subjects who corresponded to MAR of 2 quartile had 2.766 (95% CI: 1.552-4.931) probability of being in the 1 meal skippers group, while the probability of being in the more than 2 meals skippers group was 2.743(95% CI: 1.353-5.564). Also, compared to subjects who corresponded to MAR of 4 quartile, subjects who corresponded to MAR of 1 quartile had 3.471 (95% CI: 1.871-6.442) probability of being in the 1 meal skippers group, while the odds ratio for being in the more than 2 meals skippers group was 5.258(95% CI: 2.642-10.466).

Conclusions

The results have the advantage of being generalized because the study selected subjects from probability sampling of the female population of Korea. The research results showed that the elements influencing skipping meals of prime-aged mothers with children were mean nutrient adequacy ratio and the number of nutrients, under estimated average requirement intake, and others. Therefore, to encourage dietary behaviors in the right direction, an integrated approach that considers the associated factors must be realized. Future studies are needed to understand how the frequency of skipping meals of mothers affects their children.

Figures and Tables

Fig. 1

Nutrient intakes as percentage of recommended nutrient intake(DRI-2015)1) and number of under nutrients based on frequency of skipping meals of prime-aged mothers2)

1) DRI-2015: Dietary reference intakes for Koreans 2015
2) Calculated by Complex Samples General Linear Model ANOVA
kjcn-21-451-g001
Table 1

Frequency of skipping meals based on anthropometric and demographic characteristics in prime-aged mothers

kjcn-21-451-i001

1) Mean±SE, Calculated by Complex Samples General Linear Model ANOVA

2) N (%), Calculated by Complex Samples χ2-test

Table 2

Frequency of skipping meals based on health behaviors of prime-aged mothers

kjcn-21-451-i002

1) N (%), Calculated by Complex Samples χ2-test

*: p<0.05

Table 3

Frequency of skipping meals based on dietary behaviors of prime-aged mothers

kjcn-21-451-i003

1) N (%), Calculated by Complex Samples χ2-test

**: p<0.01

Table 4

Daily intake of energy and nutrients based on frequency of skipping meals of prime-aged mothers

kjcn-21-451-i004

1) Mean±SE, Calculated by Complex Samples General Linear Model ANOVA

2) AMDR (C:P:F): Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Ranges (Carbohydrate: Protein: Fat)

***: p<0.001

Table 5

Nutrient adequacy ratio(NAR) and mean nutrient adequacy ratio (MAR) based on frequency of skipping meals of prime-aged mothers

kjcn-21-451-i005

1) Mean±SE, Calculated by Complex Samples General Linear Model ANOVA

2) MAR (9): (energy, protein, calcium, iron, vitamin A, vitamin B1, vitamin B2, niacin, vitamin C) / 9

3) Number of under nutrients: Number of nutrients, under estimated average requirements intake

***: p<0.001

Table 6

Index of nutritional quality (INQ) based on frequency of skipping meals of prime-aged mothers

kjcn-21-451-i006

1) Mean±SE, Calculated by Complex Samples General Linear Model ANOVA

*: p<0.05, **: p<0.01

Table 7

Health and dietary behaviors affecting the frequency of skipping meals of prime-aged mothers N=925

kjcn-21-451-i007

1) Calculated by Complex Samples Logistic Regression Model

Table 8

Mean nutrient adequacy ratio quartile and number of under nutrients affecting the frequency of skipping meals of prime-aged mothers N=925

kjcn-21-451-i008

1) Calculated by Complex Samples Logistic Regression Model

Values were adjusted by age

2) Number of under nutrients: Number of nutrients, under estimated average requirements intake

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