Journal List > Korean J Community Nutr > v.21(4) > 1038552

Korean J Community Nutr. 2016 Aug;21(4):366-377. Korean.
Published online August 31, 2016.  https://doi.org/10.5720/kjcn.2016.21.4.366
Copyright © 2016 The Korean Society of Community Nutrition
Metabolic Syndrome Risk by Intake Ratio and Intake Pattern of Proteins in Middle-aged Men Based on the 2012-2013 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Data
Minkyoung Jang,1 Eunsil Her,2 and Kyunghea Lee1
1Department of Food and Nutrition, Changwon National University, Changwon, Korea.
2Department of Food and Nutriton, Changshin University, Changwon, Korea.

Corresponding author: Kyunghea Lee. Department of food and nutrition, Changwon, National University, 20 Changwondaehak-ro, Uichanggu, Changwon, Gyeongnam 51140, Korea. Tel: (055) 213-3514, Fax: (055) 281-7480, Email: khl@changwon.ac.kr
Received July 14, 2016; Revised August 19, 2016; Accepted August 25, 2016.

This is an Open-Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Abstract

Objectives

The purpose of the study was to compare intake of energy nutrients, physical characteristics, and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome according to protein intake group.

Methods

Subjects were 827 men aged 40-65 years. The results presented were based on data from the 2012-2013 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and analyzed using SPSS. The odds ratio (OR) of metabolic syndrome was assessed according to the protein intake group and intake pattern of protein-rich foods.

Results

The mean of protein intake was 73.96 ± 0.71 g. According to level of protein intake, four groups (deficient, normal, excess 1, excess 2) were created and their percentages were 8.3%, 39.6%, 37.1%, and 15.0% respectively. The mean of daily energy intake was 2,312.33 ± 24.08 kcal. It was higher in excess group 2 than in the deficiency group (p < 0.001). Moreover, the intake of all energy nutrients increased significantly with protein intake group (p < 0.001). The main contribution to daily protein included mixed grains (10.96 ± 0.32 g), milled rice (7.14 ± 0.30 g), chicken (3.50 ± 0.21 g), and grilled pork belly (3.04 ± 0.16 g). With regard to physical characteristics, and blood pressure and blood test results, only body mass index increased significantly according to protein intake groups (p < 0.05). The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in subjects was 38.5%, and there was no significant correlation with protein intake group. The OR of metabolic syndrome increased with protein intake, and was higher 4.452 times in excess group 2 than in the normal group (p < 0.05). Conversely, the OR of metabolic syndrome according to the frequency of protein-rich food intake did not show a significant correlation.

Conclusions

The results of this study can be used as significant supporting data to establish guidelines for protein intake in middle-aged men.

Keywords: middle-aged men; protein intake; OR of metabolic syndrome

Tables


Table 1
Distribution of protein intake ratio among study participants
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Table 2
General characteristics of the subjects by protein intake group
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Table 3
Energy nutrient intake by protein intake group1)
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Table 4
Major sources and frequency of protein intake per week (N=827)
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Table 5
Exploratory factor analysis for food sources1)
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Table 6
Anthropometric measurement and blood pressure by protein intake group1)
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Table 7
Biochemical factors related to metabolic syndrome by protein intake group1)
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Table 8
Metabolic syndrome index and the prevalence by protein intake group1)
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Table 9
Odds ratio for metabolic syndrome by protein intake group1), 3)
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Table 10
Odds ratio for metabolic syndrome by the frequency of intake of proteins per week1), 2)
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Acknowledgments

This research was supported by Changwon National University in 2015.

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