Journal List > Korean J Community Nutr > v.21(2) > 1038534

Korean J Community Nutr. 2016 Apr;21(2):140-151. Korean.
Published online April 30, 2016.  https://doi.org/10.5720/kjcn.2016.21.2.140
Copyright © 2016 The Korean Society of Community Nutrition
Dietary Habits and Perception Toward Food Additives according to the Frequency of Consumption of Convenience Food at Convenience Stores among University Students in Cheongju
Munkyong Pae
Department of Food and Nutrition, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Korea.

Corresponding author: Munkyong Pae. Department of Food and Nutrition, Chungbuk National University, 1 Chungdae-ro, Seowon-gu, Cheongju 28644, Korea. Tel: (043) 261-2745, Fax: (043) 267-2742, Email: mpae@chungbuk.ac.kr
Received January 22, 2016; Revised March 22, 2016; Accepted April 17, 2016.

This is an Open-Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Abstract

Objectives

This study was performed to examine the consumption patterns of convenience food at convenience stores, dietary habits, and perception as well as knowledge of food additives among university students.

Methods

Subjects were 352 university students in Cheongju, Korea, and data was collected by a self-administered questionnaire. They were divided into three groups according to the frequency of consumption of convenience food at convenience stores: 79 rare (≤ 1 time/month), 89 moderate (2-4 times/month) and 184 frequent (≥ 2 times/week).

Results

More subjects from the frequent consumption group lived apart from parents (p<0.001) and possessed more pocket money (p<0.01). Frequent consumption group consumed noodles, Kimbab, and sandwich & burger significantly more often (p<0.001, respectively) than others. In addition, frequent consumption of convenience foods at convenience stores was associated with frequent breakfast skipping (p<0.05), irregular meal time (p<0.01), snacking (p<0.05), and eating late night meal (p<0.001). More from the rare consumption group had heard about food additives previously compared to the frequent consumption group (79.7% vs. 63.6%, p<0.01). Frequent consumption group showed significantly higher score than did the rare consumption group for the following questions: monosodium glutamate is harmful to your health (p<0.05), food additives are necessary for food manufacturing (p<0.005), food additives need to be labeled on products (p<0.05), there is no food additive at all if labeled as no preservatives, no coloring, and no added sugar (p<0.05). There was a significant difference in degrees of choosing products with less food additives depending on the consumption pattern.

Conclusions

Our results provided a better understanding of the factors associated with frequent consumption of convenience foods at convenience stores among university students and will be useful to develop a nutrition education program for those who are more prone to consume convenience foods.

Keywords: convenience food; convenience stores; food additives; university students

Tables


Table 1
General characteristics of the subjects by self-reported frequency of convenience food consumption at convenience stores
Click for larger image


Table 2
Consumption pattern of subjects by self-reported frequency of convenience food consumptions at convenience stores
Click for larger image


Table 3
Frequency score of convenience food consumptions at convenience stores1)
Click for larger image


Table 4
Dietary habits of the subjects by self-reported frequency of convenience food consumptions at convenience stores
Click for larger image


Table 5
Recognition of subjects regarding food additives by self-reported frequency of convenience food consumptions at convenience stores
Click for larger image


Table 6
Perception of subjects regarding food additives by self-reported frequency of instant food consumptions at convenience stores
Click for larger image


Table 7
Knowledge of the subjects regarding food additives by self-reported frequency of instant food consumptions at convenience stores
Click for larger image


Table 8
Information needs of the subjects by self-reported frequency of convenience food consumptions at convenience stores
Click for larger image

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the research grant of the Chungbuk National University in 2014

References
1. Im JB, Seo BS, Lee HG, Chang YK. Life style and dietary pattern. J Korean Home Econ Assoc 1990;28(3):33–52.
2. Lim YS, Park HR, Han GJ. Comparison of preference for convenience and dietary attitude in college students by sex in Seoul and Kyunggi-do area. J Korean Diet Assoc 2005;11(1):11–20.
3. Jung EY, Lim YH, Park MS, Kim MW. A survey of the consumption of convenience foods. Korean J Community Nutr 2002;7(2):149–155.
4. Choi NJ. In: A study of nutrient content and consumption pattern of fast foods. Korean Consumer Agency; 2003 Mar.
5. Kim K, Park E. Nutrient density of fast-food consumed by the middle school students in Cheongju city. Korean J Community Nutr 2005;10(3):271–280.
6. Ji HJ, Kim SK, Yon MY, Hyun TS. Folate content of fast foods and processed foods. Korean J Nutr 2009;42(4):397–405.
7. Lee YS. In: The effects of university students' perception and knowledge about food additives on dietary life in Seoul [master's thesis]. Konkuk University; 2010.
8. Kang HJ, Byun KW. Effect of two-year course of food and nutrition on improving nutrition knowledge, dietary attitudes and food habits of junior college female students. Korean J Community Nutr 2010;15(6):750–759.
9. Kim MH, Kim H, Lee WK, Kim SJ, Yeon JY. Food habits and dietary behavior related to using processed food among male college students residing in dormitory and self-boarding in Gangwon. Korean J Community Nutr 2013;18(4):372–385.
10. Lee SL, Lee SH. Survey on health-related factors, nutrition knowledge and food habits of college students in Wonju area. Korean J Community Nutr 2015;20(2):96–108.
11. Ko MS. The comparison in daily intake of nutrients, dietary habits and body composition of female college students by body mass index. Nutr Res Pract 2007;1(2):131–142.
12. Kim KH. A Study of the dietary habits, the nutritional knowledge and the consumption patterns of convenience foods of university students in the Gwangju area. Korean J Community Nutr 2003;8(2):181–191.
13. Lee KA, Cho EJ, Yoon HS. A study on consumption of convenience foods of university students by residing types in Changwon and Masan area. J Korean Diet Assoc 2010;16(3):279–290.
14. Kim HK, Kim JH, Jung HK. A comparison of health related habits, nutrition knowledge, dietary habits, and blood composition according to gender and weight status of college students in Ulsan. Korean J Nutr 2012;45(4):336–346.
15. Moon SJ, Yoon HJ, Kim JH, Lee YJ. A study on the perception and consumption pattern of convenience foods by Korean college students. Korean J Diet Cult 1998;13(3):227–239.
16. Han MH, Cho KB, Lyu ES. Study on consumption patterns and degree of checking food-nutrition labeling of convenience foods at convenience stores by young adult workers in Busan. J Korean Soc Food Sci Nutr 2014;43(2):309–317.
17. Kim SJ, Bu SY, Choi MK. Preference and the frequency of processed food intake according to the type of residence of college students in Korea. Korean J Community Nutr 2015;20(3):188–196.
18. You JS, Chin JH, Kim MJ, Chang KJ. College students' dietary behavior, health-related lifestyles and nutrient intake status by physical activity levels using International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) in Incheon area. Korean J Nutr 2008;41(8):818–831.
19. Park EJ. Perception and consumption status of food labeling of processed foods among college students in Daegu? Gyeongbuk area. J East Asian Soc Diet Life 2013;23(6):671–680.
20. Kim EJ, Na HJ, Kim YN. Awareness on food additives and purchase of processed foods containing food additives in middle school students. J Korean Living Sci Assoc 2007;16(1):205–218.
21. Jung HY, Jung LH. Recognition of food additives of high school students in Gwangju. J Korean Home Econ Educ Assoc 2009;21(4):1–17.
22. Han MY, Ahn MS. A study on the purchase action of processed foods and the recognition for food additives of urban housewives. Korean J Diet Cult 1998;13(2):119–126.
23. Korean Society for the Study of Obesity. Guideline for treatment of obesity. Seoul: Korean Society for the Study of Obesity; 2012. pp. 17-21.
24. Chang SO. The amount of sodium in the processed foods, the use of sodium information on the nutrition label and the acceptance of sodium reduced ramen in the female college students. Korean J Nutr 2006;39(6):585–591.
25. Kim JR. In: A report on quality examination of Triangular Kimbab at convenience stores. Korean Consumer Agency; 2013 Jul.
26. Ministry of Health and Welfare, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES-VII). 2015 Dec.
Report No. 11702.
27. Chung EJ, Shim EG. Salt-related dietary behaviors and sodium intakes of university students in Gyeonggi-do. J Korean Soc Food Sci Nutr 2008;37(5):578–588.
28. Choi JG, Shin MK, Seo ES. A study on self-evaluated obesity and food habits by residence type of college students in Ik-San area. J Korean Living Sci Assoc 2004;13(1):97–110.
29. Choi MK, Jun YS, Park MK. A study on eating patterns and nutrient intakes of college students by residences of self-boarding and home with parents in Chungnam. J Korean Diet Assoc 2000;6(1):9–16.
30. Kim HC, Kim MR. Analysis on recognition, practice and information acquisition behaviors regarding food additives of university students. J East Asian Soc Diet Life 2014;24(5):572–584.
31. Jeon SI. In: Problems in the delivery of food additives information and government strategies for them. Ministry of Food and Drug Safety; 2006 Nov.