Journal List > Korean J Community Nutr > v.17(5) > 1038386

Korean J Community Nutr. 2012 Oct;17(5):637-651. Korean.
Published online October 31, 2012.  https://doi.org/10.5720/kjcn.2012.17.5.637
Copyright © 2012 The Korean Society of Community Nutrition
Measurements of Salinity and Salt Content by Menu Types Served at Industry Foodservice Operations in Daegu
Ji-Ae Kim, Yun-Hwa Kim, Moon-Young Ann,1 and Yeon-Kyung Lee
Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea.
1Daegu Medical Center, Daegu, Korea.

Corresponding author: Yeon-Kyung Lee, Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Kyungpook National University, 80 Daehakro, Bukgu, Daegu 702-701, Korea. Tel: (053) 950-6234, Fax: (053) 950-6229, Email: yklee@knu.ac.kr
Received February 29, 2012; Revised July 02, 2012; Accepted October 22, 2012.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate salinity and sodium content in foods served at industry foodservice operations in selected workplaces in Daegu. The researcher collected 1,142 food items categorized into 22 menu item groups from lunch samples served at 100 industry foodservice operations and measured the salinity of the food items, and calculated sodium and salt contents from the salinity. In terms of salt content of one meal at each workplace, 46% of the meals were 3-<5 g, and only 3.0% of them were 1.7 g or less, which is one third of the daily target intake (5 g) presented by the Dietary Reference Intakes for Koreans. In terms of sodium content, 35.3% of the meals were 1,000-< 1,500 mg (most), and only 2.5% of them were 667 mg or less, which is, again, one third of the daily target intake. As to the salinity of each menu item group, side dishes such as sauces, kimchi, seasoned vegetables, hard-boiled foods, and stir-fried foods were significantly higher, but the sodium content was not higher, because their quantity per serving was small. The salinity of foods with liquid such as stews, noodles, soups, and broths was relatively lower, but the sodium content was higher, because their quantity per serving was large. This indicates that an education program should be developed for foodservice workers who prepare food for the workplace regarding the development and promotion of various menus for reducing sodium content, in order to reduce sodium content in meals served by food service in the workplace.

Keywords: salinity; salt content; sodium content; industry foodservice

Tables


Table 1
Lunch menus served by industry foodservise operations in Daegu
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Table 2
The salt and sodium contents in lunches served at industry foodservice operations in Daegu
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Table 3
The salinity and salt content of the dishes groups served at industry foodservice operations
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Table 4
The salinity and salt content of one-dish rice, porridges, noodles per serving
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Table 5
The salinity and salt content of soups per serving
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Table 6
The salinity and salt content of broths and stews per serving
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Table 7
The salinity and salt content of stir-fried foods per serving
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Table 8
The salinity and salt content of hard-boiled foods per serving
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Table 9
The salinity and salt content of kimchies and sauces per serving
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