Journal List > Hanyang Med Rev > v.38(2) > 1111608

Hanyang Med Rev. 2018 Jun;38(2):85-92. Korean.
Published online Jun 30, 2018.  https://doi.org/10.7599/hmr.2018.38.2.85
© 2018 Hanyang University College of Medicine · Institute of Medical Science
Microbiome Research in Atopic Dermatitis
Min-Hye Kim
Department of Internal Medicine, Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Corresponding Author: Min-Hye Kim. Department of Internal Medicine, Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, 1071 Anyangcheon-ro, Yangcheon-gu, Seoul 07985, Korea. Tel: +82-2-2650-6018, Fax: +82-2-2655-2076, Email: mineyang81@ewha.ac.kr
Received Apr 03, 2018; Revised May 05, 2018; Accepted Jun 12, 2018.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Abstract

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a representative allergic disease that is accompanied with high disease prevalence and considerable socioeconomic burden. While the pathophysiology is largely unknown, the role of microbes in health and diseases has drawn attention. The development of metagenomics that is a recent advance in analyzing microbiome has enabled us to research how microbiome impacts the development and aggravation of AD. Skin microbiome and intestinal microbiome are assumed to affect the AD. Research has shown a difference in skin and intestinal microbial composition between AD patients and normal controls. Based on the findings of microbial impacts on the AD, efforts to use probiotics for the treatment or prevention of AD have been made. However, further research is needed until the firm conclusion is reached.

Keywords: Dermatitis; Atopic; Microbiota; Microbiome

Tables


Table 1
Human microbiome studies on atopic dermatitis* [40]
Click for larger image

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