Journal List > J Korean Neuropsychiatr Assoc > v.57(3) > 1100364

Kim: Treatment-Resistant Schizophrenia : Pathophysiology and Treatment

Abstract

A large proportion of patients with schizophrenia show a poor response to first-line antipsychotic drugs, which is termed treatment-resistant schizophrenia. Previous studies found that a different neurobiology might underlie treatment-resistant schizophrenia, which necessitates the development of different therapeutic approaches for treating treatment-resistant schizophrenia. This study reviewed previous studies on the pathophysiology of treatment-resistant schizophrenia and the pharmacological intervention, and forthcoming investigations of treatment-resistant schizophrenia are suggested.

Notes

Conflicts of Interest The authors have no financial conflicts of interest.

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