Journal List > J Korean Neuropsychiatr Assoc > v.57(3) > 1100325

Kim: Psychosocial Intervention for Patients with Schizophrenia

Abstract

Treatment of schizophrenia has as its ultimate goals, the functional recovery of the patients and improvement of their quality of life. While antipsychotic medication is the fundamental method for treating schizophrenia, it has certain limitations in terms of treating the illness beyond its positive symptoms. Therefore, psychosocial intervention should be used in tandem with pharmacological methods in treating schizophrenia. The efficacy of several modes of psychosocial intervention for improving outcomes in schizophrenia is well attested. Approximately 10 modes of psychosocial intervention have been recommended based on existing evidence, including family intervention, cognitive behavioral therapy, supported employment, early intervention services, lifestyle intervention for physical health enhancement, treatment of comorbid substance abuse, assertive community treatment, cognitive remediation, social skills training, and peer support. Ideally, these interventions are offered to patients in combination with one another. Over the last decade, increased emphasis has been placed on early detection and intervention, with particular focus on long-term recovery. Early intervention with comprehensive psychosocial interventions should be enacted promptly from the initial detection of schizophrenia.

Figures and Tables

Table 1

Psychosocial intervention suggested by guidelines

jkna-57-235-i001

+ : Consensus-based recommendation, ++ : Intermediate evidence-based recommendation, +++ : Strong evidence-based recommendation

Table 2

Role of psychiatrists for community mental health service

jkna-57-235-i002
Table 3

Community early intervention service in the world

jkna-57-235-i003

Notes

Conflicts of Interest The authors have no financial conflicts of interest.

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