Journal List > J Korean Soc Spine Surg > v.22(3) > 1099789

J Korean Soc Spine Surg. 2015 Sep;22(3):92-98. Korean.
Published online September 30, 2015.  https://doi.org/10.4184/jkss.2015.22.3.92
© Copyright 2015 Korean Society of Spine Surgery
The Outcomes of Short and Long Segment Posterior Instrumentation of Thoracolumbar Burst Fractures with a Load Sharing Score of 7 or More
Jeong Ho Seo, M.D. and Kyu Yeol Lee, M.D., Ph.D.
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, College of Medicine, Dong A University, Korea.

Corresponding author: Kyu Yeol Lee, M.D. Department of Orthopedic Surgery, College of Medicine, Dong-A University, 1, Dongdaesin-dong 3-ga, Seo-gu, Busan 602-715, Korea. TEL: +82-51-240-2867, FAX: +82-51-243-9764, Email: gylee@dau.ac.kr
Received July 09, 2015; Revised July 10, 2015; Accepted September 01, 2015.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Abstract

Study Design

Retrospective.

Objectives

To investigate outcomes between short and long segment posterior instrumentation of thoracolumbar burst fractures with a load sharing score of 7 or more.

Summary of Literature Review

Short segment instrumentation has been recommended in thoracolumbar burst fractures with a load sharing score of 6 or less, and long segment instrumentation has been recommended for those with a score of 7 or more. However, this standard is controversial.

Materials and Methods

From March 2006 to January 2014, 45 patients with thoracolumbar fractures with a load sharing score of 7 or more were treated with posterior instrumentation. They were divided into two groups: short (group S) and long segment (group L) groups. Radiologic results were evaluated on the basis of the kyphotic angle and anterior column height. Complications were also reviewed.

Results

Groups S and L consisted of 13 and 32 patients and had mean ages of 48.3 and 47.3 years, respectively. In group S, the anterior column height increased from 56.62% to 76.23% postoperatively, and remained at 71.15% at follow-up. The kyphotic angle decreased from 16.27° to 7.55° postoperatively, and was 13.17° at follow-up. In group L, the anterior column height recovered from 49.67% to 70.52% postoperatively, and was 63.73% at follow-up. The kyphotic angle decreased from 20.08° to 6.80° postoperatively, and was 14.18° at follow-up. The changes in the anterior column height and kyphotic angle were not significantly different between groups S and L. Seven cases had complications and the number of cases with complications was not significantly different between groups S and L.

Conclusions

Short and long segment instrumentation of thoracolumbar fractures with a load sharing score of 7 or more did not achieve significantly different results.

Keywords: Thoracolumbar; Burst; Segment; Fracture; Load sharing

Figures


Fig. 1
A 48-year-old male patient with an L1 burst fracture treated by short segment pedicle screw fixation. (A) Preoperative radiograph (B) Postoperative radiograph (C) Preoperative computed tomography
Click for larger image


Fig. 2
A 27-year-old male patient with an L1 burst fracture treated by long segment pedicle screw fixation. (A) Preoperative radiograph (B) Postoperative radiograph (C) Preoperative computed tomography
Click for larger image

Tables


Table 1
Load Shearing Classification of Spine Fractures
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Table 2
Demographic Data
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