Journal List > J Nutr Health > v.49(6) > 1081470

J Nutr Health. 2016 Dec;49(6):447-458. Korean.
Published online December 31, 2016.  https://doi.org/10.4163/jnh.2016.49.6.447
© 2016 The Korean Nutrition Society
Age difference in association between obesity and Nutrition Quotient scores of preschoolers and school children
Joo-Mee Bae and Myung-Hee Kang
Department of Food & Nutrition, Daedeok Valley Campus, Hannam University, Daejeon 34054, Korea.

To whom correspondence should be addressed. tel: +82-42-629-8791, Email: mhkang@hnu.kr
Received November 08, 2016; Revised November 19, 2016; Accepted December 02, 2016.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Abstract

Purpose

This study was conducted among 235 children aged 3 up to 11 yrs to examine the relationship between subjects' eating behaviors and obesity.

Methods

The subjects were divided into three age groups: preschoolers aged 3 to 5 yrs, early elementary school students aged 6 to 8 yrs, and late elementary school students aged 9 to 11 yrs. As a tool for eating behaviors, the recently developed nutrition quotient (NQ) questionnaire was utilized. By age group, scores were gathered and calculated in the five factors, “Balance”, “Diversity”, “Moderation”, “Regularity”, and “Practice”, which make up the NQ scores.

Results

The NQ scores among those aged 3 to 5, 6 to 8, and 9 to 11 yrs did not exhibit any significant differences. Among the scores for the five factors of the NQ, the Diversity scores of those aged 9 to 11 yrs were significantly higher than the scores of those aged 3 to 5 and those aged 6 to 8 yrs. The scores of those aged 3 to 5 and those aged 6 to 8 yrs were higher than the scores of those aged 9 to 11 yrs in Moderation and Regularity. When the subjects were divided into low-weight/normal and overweight/obese groups, among those aged 6 to 8 yrs, the NQ scores, Moderation, Regularity, and Practice scores were higher in the overweight/obese group than those in the low-weight/normal group. Among those aged 9 to 11 yrs, the overweight/obese group scored higher than the low-weight/normal group only in the Moderation component.

Conclusion

From the results, to prevent obesity in elementary school students, it is practical to focus on training related to eating behavior items included in the Moderation component. Furthermore, personalized instructions on eating behaviors and nutritional education based on age are necessary to prevent obesity in children.

Keywords: eating behavior; nutrition quotient (NQ) score; obesity; preschooler; school children

Tables


Table 1
Characteristics of the subjects
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Table 2
NQ scores and NQ factor scores of preschoolers and school children
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Table 3
NQ1) grade of the preschoolers and school children
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Table 4
Comparison of NQ scores and scores of NQ factors between children by weight status1)
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Table 5
Correlation coefficients between body weight and NQ scores of preschoolers and school children
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Table 6
Comparison of checklist items for balance factor according to ages
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Table 7
Comparison of checklist items for diversity factor according to ages
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Table 8
Comparison of checklist items for moderation factor according to ages
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Table 9
Comparison of checklist items for regularity factor according to ages
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Table 10
Comparison of checklist items for practice factor according to ages
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