Journal List > J Nutr Health > v.48(2) > 1081380

J Nutr Health. 2015 Apr;48(2):140-148. Korean.
Published online April 30, 2015.  https://doi.org/10.4163/jnh.2015.48.2.140
© 2015 The Korean Nutrition Society
Effects of coffee powder supplementation on the blood glucose and antioxidative enzyme activity of liver tissue in STZ-induced diabetic rats
Jihyun Bae,1 Yun-Jung Jung,2 and Mi-Ja Choi2
1The Graduate School of Pharmacy, Keimyung University, Daegu 704-701, Korea.
2Department of Food and Nutrition, Keimyung University, Daegu 704-701, Korea.

To whom correspondence should be addressed. tel: +82-53-580-5874, Email: choimj@kmu.ac.kr
Received February 23, 2015; Revised March 18, 2015; Accepted March 25, 2015.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of coffee in diabetic rats in order to prevent hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia, and to improve antioxidant enzyme activity in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats.

Methods

Thirty two male Sprague-Dawley rats (body weight 200 ± 5 g) were divided into two groups; diabetic and nondiabetic groups. The groups were each randomly divided into two subgroups; fed control and coffee (5 g coffee powder/kg diet) diets. Diabetes was induced by intramuscular injection of 50 mg streptozotocin/kg body weight. Rats with blood glucose concentrations ≥ 300 mg/dL were considered diabetic for these experiments. All rats were fed an experimental diet and deionized water ad libitum for 4 weeks.

Results

The results of this study indicate that body weight gain was significantly lower in diabetic groups than in nondiabetic groups regardless of diet. Mean food intake was significantly higher in diabetic groups than in nondiabetic groups, and significantly higher in the coffee group than in the control group in diabetic rats. Food efficiency ratio (FER) was significantly lower in diabetic groups than in nondiabetic groups regardless of diet. The fasting blood glucose of coffee supplemented groups was significantly lower compared with the control group in diabetic and nondiabetic rats. The levels of serum LDL-cholesterol and atherogenic index were significantly lower in the coffee group than in the control group in diabetic and nondiabetic rats, and serum HDL-cholesterol was significantly higher in the coffee group than in control groups. The contents of hepatic triglyceride were significantly lower in the coffee group than in the control group in diabetic and nondiabetic rats. The lipid peroxidation of malondialdehyde (MDA) contents was significantly lower in the coffee group than in the control group in diabetic and nondiabetic rats. Activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase in liver was not significantly different by experimental diets among all groups.

Conclusion

In conclusion, effects of 0.5% coffee powder supplemented diet were beneficial on blood glucose and lipids in diabetic rats.

Keywords: diabetic rats; coffee powder; blood glucose; lipid peroxidation; antioxidative enzyme activity

Tables


Table 1
Composition of experimental diets (g/kg diet)
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Table 2
The effect of coffee powder on body weight gain in diabetic rats
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Table 3
The effect of coffee powder on food intake and food efficiency ratio (FER) in diabetic rats
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Table 4
The effect of coffee powder on fasting glucose and serum lipid concentrations in diabetic rats
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Table 5
The effect of coffee powder on the liver lipid and malondialdehyde content in diabetic rats
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Table 6
The effect of coffee powder on the liver activities of SOD, GPx, catalase in diabetic rats
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