Journal List > J Korean Thyroid Assoc > v.6(1) > 1056542

J Korean Thyroid Assoc. 2013 May;6(1):56-63. Korean.
Published online May 31, 2013.  https://doi.org/10.11106/jkta.2013.6.1.56
Copyright © 2013. the Korean Thyroid Association. All rights reserved.
Incidence & Prevalence of Hyperthyroidism and Preference for Therapeutic Modalities in Korea
Gi Hyeon Seo,1 Sun Wook Kim,2 and Jae Hoon Chung2
1Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service, Seoul, Korea.
2Division of Endocrinology & Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Correspondence: Jae Hoon Chung, MD, PhD, Division of Endocrinology & Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Irwon-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710, Korea. Tel: 82-2-3410-3434, Fax: 82-2-3410-3849, Email: thyroid@skku.edu
Received January 02, 2013; Revised February 13, 2013; Accepted February 14, 2013.

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/), which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Abstract

Background and Objectives

The incidence and prevalence of hyperthyroidism has been reported to be 0.2-0.9/1000 population/year and 5-10/1000 population in foreign countries, respectively. However, there has been no nationwide survey to evaluate them in Korea. Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate the incidence and prevalence of hyperthyroidism in Korea using medicare claims data provided by the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service. Preference for its therapeutic modalities and its change were also analyzed.

Materials and Methods

This study was performed in 308,584 (men 86,460, women 222,124) Korean patients with hyperthyroidism treated from January 2006 to June 2012. Patients with past history of hyperthyroidism were not included.

Results

The incidence of hyperthyroidism was 0.72/1000 population/year (men 0.40, women 1.03), and its prevalence was 3.40/1000 population (men 2.09, women 4.70) in Korea. Its peak prevalence was detected between 45 and 49 years of age. Among 177,487 patients with hyperthyroidism treated from 2007 to 2011, anti-thyroid drugs were prescribed in 97.9%, and radioiodine therapy and surgery were finally performed in 8.2% and 0.9%, respectively. The prescription of propylthiouracil (PTU) has been reduced from 63.3% in 2007 to 42.9% in 2011, but the use of methimazole (MMI) increased from 33.9% in 2007 to 54.8% in 2011. Primary physicians preferred PTU to MMI, but physicians in general hospitals preferred MMI to PTU.

Conclusion

This is the first nationwide report to investigate the incidence and prevalence of hyperthyroidism in Korea.

Keywords: Hyperthyroidism; Incidence; Prevalence; Propylthiouracil; Methimazole

Figures


Fig. 1
Annual change of prescription rate of anti-thyroid drugs from 2007 to 2011. The prescription of propylthiouracil (PTU) has been reduced from 63% in 2007 to 43% in 2011, but the use of methimazole (MMI) increased from 34% in 2007 to 55% in 2011. CAMZ: carbimazole, MMI: methimazole, PTU: propylthiouracil.
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Tables


Table 1
Incidence of hyperthyroidism in Korea according to age and gend er (2011)
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Table 2
Annual change of incidence of hyperthyroidism in Korea from 2007 to 2011
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Table 3
Prevalence of hyperthyroidism in Korea according to age and gender (2011)
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Table 4
Annual change of actual prescription number of anti-thyroid drugs from 2007 to 2011 according to the hospital size
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