Journal List > Korean J Nutr > v.43(1) > 1043806

Korean J Nutr. 2010 Feb;43(1):12-25. Korean.
Published online February 28, 2010.  https://doi.org/10.4163/kjn.2010.43.1.12
© 2010 The Korean Nutrition Society
Bioavailability and Digestibility of Organic Calcium Sources by Bone Health Index
Jeongho Han,1 Eunmi Kim,2 Manki Cheong,1 Sungkew Chee,3 and Kewmahn Chee1
1College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-702, Korea.
2Korea Food Research Institute, Sungnam 463-746, Korea.
3Sampoong B&F Co. Ltd. Seoul 143-960, Korea.

To whom correspondence should be addressed. (Email: kem@kfri.re.kr )
Received December 16, 2009; Revised January 05, 2010; Accepted January 12, 2010.

Abstract

This study was carried out to evaluate the bioavailabilities and the digestibilities of oligopeptide chelated (peptide-Ca), anchovy bone (anchovy-Ca) and methionine hydroxyl analogue (MHA-Ca) calcium compared to those of calcium carbonate in rats. In exp1, CaCO3, were added to the basal diet at level of 0, 30 and 60% calcium of the AIN-93G diet. In test groups, peptide-Ca, anchovy-Ca and MHA-Ca, were added to the basal diet to provide calcium at the level of 40% of AIN-93G. In exp1, the bioavailabilities were evaluated from the regression equation of the ratios of theological/actual calcium intakes of each dietary treatment. In exp2, urine and feces was to evaluate the true- and apparent digestibility and apparent retention. In exp1, Ca-60% group had higher bone mineral density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC) and bone breaking strength (BBS) than those of the other standard groups. The bone weight and ash content of the peptide-Ca and anchovy-Ca groups were significantly higher than those of the MHA-Ca. Bone calcium content were not significantly different from the test group. The bioavailability of the MHA-Ca group was shown higher BMD (71%), BS (38%) and BBS (27%) compared to another control group. But the regression coefficient for BMD, BS and BBS were lower compare with that of bone ash and BMC. In exp2, the true- and apparent digestibility of test groups were shown to over 90%. Peptide-Ca was not significantly different from other test group, but digestibility and retention were higher compare to other test groups. In conclusion, peptide-Ca, anchovy-Ca and MHA-Ca improved Ca bioavailability in the rats. The compounds were higher Ca digestibility compared with those of CaCO3. It is assumed that difference of digestibility for test groups may be correlated to the bioavailability of test groups in BMD, BMC, BS, BBS and bone ash respectively.

Keywords: calcium; bioavailability; digestibility; bone calcium; rat

Figures


Fig. 1
Relationship between BMD and Ca intake from calcium standard diets groups.
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Fig. 2
Relationship between BMC and Ca intake from calcium standard diets groups.
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Fig. 3
Relationship between BS and Ca intake from calcium standard diets groups.
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Fig. 4
Relationship between BBS and Ca intake from calcium standard diets groups.
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Fig. 5
Relationship between bone ash (%) and Ca intake (mg/rat/day) from calcium standard diets groups.
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Tables


Table 1
Composition of diets (%) for calcium bioavailability test (Experiments 1, 2)
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Table 2
Analyzed and calculated calcium contents of the calcium sources, and experimental diets
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Table 3
Instron conditions for bone breaking strength and bone stiffness
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Table 4
AAS conditions for calcium analysis
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Table 5
Body weight gain, feed intake, calcium intake and FER in rats fed the experimental diets for 3 weeks1)
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Table 6
Ca bioavailability based on body weight gain in rats fed the diets containing various Ca sources
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Table 7
Total bone mineral density (TBMD), total bone mineral content (TBMC), total bone area, bone mineral density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC), bone area in rats fed the experimental diets for 3 weeks
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Table 8
Ca bioavailability based on bone mineral density (BMD) in rats fed the diets containing various Ca sources
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Table 9
Ca bioavailability based on bone mineral content (BMC) in rats fed the diets containing various Ca sources
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Table 10
Bone length, bone stiffness (BS) and bone breaking strength (BBS) in rats fed the experimental diets for 3 weeks1)
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Table 11
Ca bioavailability based on bone stiffness (BS) in rats fed the diets containing various Ca sources
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Table 12
Ca bioavailability based on bone bone breaking strength (BBS) in rats fed the diets containing various Ca sources
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Table 13
Bone weight, ash, calcium and serum calcium in rats fed the experimental diets for 3 weeks1)
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Table 14
Ca bioavailability based on bone ash in rats fed the diets containing various Ca sources1)
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Table 15
Body weight gain, feed intake, calcium intake and FER in rats fed the experimental diets for 6days1)
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Table 16
True - and apparent digestibility, and apparent retention in rats fed the experimental diets for 6 days1)
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