Journal List > Korean J Orthod > v.40(5) > 1043637

Kim, Cha, Yu, and Hwang: Comparison of mandibular anterior alveolar bone thickness in different facial skeletal types

Abstract

Objective

The purpose of this study was to determine differences of mandibular anterior alveolar bone thickness and symphysial cross sectional area in 9 different horizontal and vertical facial types.

Methods

By using the initial cephalometric radiographs of 270 adult patients (male 135, female 135), the authors measured the buccolingual thickness of anterior alveolar bone on the basis of the root axis and symphysial cross sectional distance.

Results

The high angle group showed significantly thinner buccolingual alveolar bone width except for the CEJ area and lingual alveolar bone width (p < 0.05). The low angle group and Class I, II average group showed similar or significantly thicker alveolar bone width than the Class I average group (p < 0.05). The Class III average group showed significantly thinner buccolingual and lingual alveolar bone width than Class I and II average groups (p < 0.05). The Class III high angle group showed minimal alveolar bone width in all facial skeletal types. No significant difference was found in the symphysial cross sectional area of the different vertical facial skeletal types (p > 0.05).

Conclusions

The results of this study found that Class III high angle patients have thinner mandibular anterior alveolar bone thickness; therefore, more attention will be needed to determine the incisor position during orthodontic treatment for this group of patients.

Figures and Tables

Fig. 1
Measurement of mandibular alveolar bone width and dimension. T1T, Buccolingual width (mm) of mandibular anterior alveolar bone at 2 mm under CEJ; T2T, buccolingual width (mm) of mandibular alveolar bone at middle of root; T3T, buccolingual width (mm) of mandibular alveolar bone at 2 mm over root apex; T1L, lingual alveolar bone thickness (mm) of mandible at 2 mm under CEJ; T2L, lingual alveolar bone thickness (mm) of mandible at middle of root; T3L, lingual alveolar bone thickness (mm) of mandible at 2 mm over root apex; T1B, buccal alveolar bone thickness (mm) of mandible at 2 mm under CEJ; T2B, buccal alveolar bone thickness (mm) of mandible at middle of root; T3B, buccal alveolar bone thickness (mm) of mandible at 2 mm over root apex; S, symphysial cross sectional area (mm2) of including root area.
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Fig. 2
Buccal and lingual cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) on cephalometric X-ray film.
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Fig. 3
Error bar graph (Mean ± SD) of buccolingual alveolar bone width at midroot (T2T) and root apex (T3T). *Significant at the significance level of 0.05; significant at the significance level of 0.01.
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Fig. 4
Error bar graph (Mean ± SD) of lingual alveolar bone width at CEJ (T1L), midroot (T2L), and root apex (T3L). *Significant at the significance level of 0.01.
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Table 1
Comparison of age (year), ANB (degree), SN-MP (degree) of subjects in nine subgroups (Mean ± SD)
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SD, Standard deviation.

Table 2
Frequency distribution table of age
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Table 3
Comparison of IMPA (degree) of subjects in nine subgroups (Mean ± SD)
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*Significant at the significance level of 0.05; significant at the significance level of 0.01.

Table 4
Comparison of measurements of Class I, II, III groups (Mean ± SD)
kjod-40-314-i004

NS, Not significant; *Significant at the significance level of 0.05; significant at the significance level of 0.01.

Table 5
Group comparison of measurements for low angle, average, high angle groups (Mean ± SD)
kjod-40-314-i005

NS, Not significant; *Significant at the significance level of 0.05; significant at the significance level of 0.01.

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