Journal List > J Korean Foot Ankle Soc > v.19(2) > 1043370

J Korean Foot Ankle Soc. 2015 Jun;19(2):47-50. Korean.
Published online June 08, 2015.  https://doi.org/10.14193/jkfas.2015.19.2.47
Copyright © 2015 The Korean Foot and Ankle Society. All rights reserved.
Autologous Osteochondral Transplantation as a Secondary Procedure after Failed Microfracture for Osteochondral Lesion of Talus
Su-Young Bae
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Corresponding Author: Su-Young Bae. Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Inje University Sanggye Paik Hospital, 1342 Dongil-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul 139-707, Korea. Tel: 82-2-950-1399, Fax: 82-2-950-1398, Email: sybae99@gmail.com
Received January 27, 2015; Revised March 29, 2015; Accepted April 22, 2015.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Abstract

Microfracture procedure has been widely recognized as the primary surgical treatment for an osteochondral lesion of the talus. However, if symptoms persist after initial surgery, selection of a secondary procedure can be difficult. The author desciribes the advantage and value of autologous osteochondral transplantation as a secondary procedure after failed microfracture for osteochondral lesion with a review of sevral previous published articles.

Keywords: Talus; Osteochondral lesion of talus; Microfracture; Autologous osteochondral transplantation

Figures


Figure 1
Increased fluid pressure (arrows) from the damaged cartilage (C) can make crack of subchondral bone plate (S) or interferes with the healing of plate.
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Figure 2
When a load (arrows) is applied repeatedly, cystic lesion can be made by the pressure from the cartilage or the joint fluid. The cartilage (C) is depicted as a white layer and subchondral bone (S) as dotted area.
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Figure 3
Autologous osteochondral transplantation was performed to replace the cartilage (C) and subchondral bone (S) for a failed case.
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Notes

Financial support:None.

Conflict of interest:None.

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