Journal List > J Korean Ophthalmol Soc > v.58(8) > 1010840

J Korean Ophthalmol Soc. 2017 Aug;58(8):981-985. Korean.
Published online August 16, 2017.  https://doi.org/10.3341/jkos.2017.58.8.981
©2017 The Korean Ophthalmological Society
Two Cases of Corneal Neovascularization Improved by Electrocauterization and Subconjunctival Bevacizumab Injection
Jun Soo Eun, MD and Kyong Jin Cho, MD, PhD
Department of Ophthalmology, Dankook University College of Medicine, Cheonan, Korea.

Address reprint requests to Kyong Jin Cho, MD, PhD. Department of Ophthalmology, Dankook University Hospital, #201 Manghyang-ro, Dongnam-gu, Cheonan 31116, Korea. Tel: 82-41-550-6497, Fax: 82-41-556-0524, Email: perfectcure@hanmail.net
Received January 26, 2017; Revised June 22, 2017; Accepted July 28, 2017.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Abstract

Purpose

To report an experience of improving symptoms through treatment with electrocauterization and subconjunctival bevacizumab injection in two patients with keratitis accompanied by corneal neovascularization and opacity.

Case summary

(Case 1) A 20-year-old woman visited our institution complaining of binocular blurred vision and congestion for the previous 3 years. Her best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 0.07 in the right eye and 0.4 in the left eye (Han Chun-suk visual acuity chart, decimal). The diagnosis was bilateral rosacea keratitis. Antibiotics, steroid eye drops and oral antibiotics were administered, but no improvement was observed. Electrocauterization was performed at the origin of the neovascularization of the cornea and bevacizumab was injected at the peripheral subconjunctiva in the right eye. Thereafter the corneal neovascularization did not recur, corneal opacity was reduced, and BCVA improved to 0.5. (Case 2) A 19-year-old woman visited complaining of left eye congestion for the previous 3 years. Her BCVA was 1.0 in the right eye and 0.08 in the left eye.The diagnosis was phlyctenular keratitis of the left eye. Antibiotics, steroid eye drops and oral antibiotics were administered, but no improvement was observed. Therefore, electrocauterization and subconjunctival bevacizumab injection were performed in the cornea of the left eye, after which corneal neovascularization and opacity decreased.

Conclusions

In these cases, we report improvement of symptoms after treatment with electrocauterization and subconjunctival bevacizumab injection after failed treatment of palpebral sanitation, antibiotic and steroid.

Keywords: Bevacizumab; Electrocautery; Phlyctenular keratitis; Rosacea keratitis

Figures


Figure 1
20 years old woman with a history of rosacea keratitis. Color photographs of her right eye before electrocauterization and subconjunctival bevacizumab injection (A), bleaching vessels was shown in 2 weeks after treatment (B), 2 months after treatment, neovascularization did not recur and corneal opacity was significantly diminished in her cornea of the right eye (C).
Click for larger image


Figure 2
19 years old woman with a history of phlyctenular keratoconjunctivitis. Color photographs of her left eye before electrocauterization and subconjunctival bevacizumab injection (A), bleaching vessels was shown in 1 month after treatment (B), 1 year after treatment, neovascularization did not recur and corneal opacity was significantly diminished in her cornea of the left eye (C).
Click for larger image

Notes

The present research was conducted by the research fund of Dankook University in 2017.

Conflicts of Interest:The authors have no conflicts to disclose.

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