Journal List > J Korean Ophthalmol Soc > v.50(11) > 1008413

Youm, Oh, Yu, and Song: The Prevalence of Vitreoretinal Diseases in a Screened Korean Population 50 Years and Older

Abstract

Purpose

To describe the prevalence of vitreoretinal diseases in the Korean population 50 years or older at a health screening center.

Methods

The participants of this study included 11,180 adults 50 years of age and older who visited the Health Promotion Center of Kangbuk Samsung Hospital from January to December 2006. Digital images of non-mydriatic fundus photographs were examined. We calculated the sex- and age-adjusted prevalence of vitreoretinal diseases using the direct standardized method based on the number of resident registrations.

Results

The age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of vitreoretinal diseases in Korean adults 50 years of age and older was 9.9%. The prevalence of vitreoretinal diseases significantly increased with age (P=0.000). There was no significant gender difference in the prevalence of vitreoretinal diseases (p=0.553). Age-related macular degeneration was the most common vitreoretinal disease, with an age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of 5.2%. Epiretinal membrane, retinal vein occlusion, and diabetic retinopathy were common vitreoretinal diseases in that order, and the age- and sex-adjusted prevalences were 1.5%, 1.1%, and 0.9%, respectively.

Conclusions

The prevalence of vitreoretinal diseases in a screened Korean population 50 years and older was 9.9%. Vitreoretinal diseases are a major ophthalmic problem in Korea. As the Korean population continues to age and the prevalence of diabetes increases, further investigations about the epidemiology and prevention of vitreoretinal diseases are needed.

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Table 1.
Age and sex distribution of vitreoretinal disease in the study population
  Participants, No. Eyes, No. Prevalence, %(95% CI*) Relative prevlaence
Age, y        
 50∼59 7627 321 4.2 (3.7∼4.7) 1.0
 60∼69 3016 338 11.2 (10.1∼12.3) 2.7
 70∼ 537 87 16.2 (13.1∼19.3) 3.9
Total 11,180 746 6.7 (6.2∼7.2)  
Sex        
 M 6276 411 6.5 (5.9∼7.1) 1.0
 F 4904 335 6.8 (6.1∼7.5) 1.0
Total 11,180 746 6.7 (6.2∼7.2)  

*CI=confidence interval.

Table 2.
Age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of vitreoretinal diseases in the study population
Disease Eyes, No. Age- and sex-adjusted prevalence, %
AMD* 335 5.2
 Early AMD 314 4.8
 Late AMD 21 0.4
  Exudative AMD 11 0.2
ERM 115 1.5
Retinal vein occlusion 87 1.1
DR 86 0.9
Asteroid hyalosis 35 0.4
Pathologic myopia 29 0.4
Retinal hemorrhage 19 0.2
Retinal degeneration 23 0.1
Others 17 0.2

*AMD=age-related macular degeneration

ERM=epiretinal membrane

DR=diabetic retinopathy.

Table 3.
Prevalence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in the study population by age and sex
  AMD* Early AMD Late AMD
Eyes Prevalence, % Relative prevalence Eyes Prevalence, % Relative prevalence Eyes Prevalence, % Relative prevalence
Age, y                  
 50∼59 142 1.9 1.0 137 1.8 1.0 5 0.1 1.0
 60∼69 151 5.0 2.6 140 4.6 2.6 11 0.4 4.0
 70∼ 42 7.8 4.1 37 6.9 3.8 5 0.9 9.0
Total 335 3.0   314     21 0.2  
Sex                  
 M 191 3.0 1.0 178 2.8 1.0 13 0.2 1.0
 F 144 2.9 1.0 136 2.8 1.0 8 0.2 1.0
Total 335 3.0   314 2.8   21 0.2  

*AMD=age-related macular degeneration.

Table 4.
Prevalence of epiretinal membrane (ERM), retinal vein occlusion, and diabetic retinopathy (DR) in the study population by age and sex
  ERM* Retinal vein occlusion DR
Eyes Prevalence, % Relative prevalence Eyes Prevalence, % Relative prevalence Eyes Prevalence, % Relative prevalence
Age, y                  
 50∼59 49 0.6 1.0 35 0.5 1.0 35 0.5 1.0
 60∼69 52 1.7 2.8 41 1.4. 2.8 41 1.4 2.8
 70∼ 14 2.6 4.3 11 2.0 4.0 10 1.9 3.8
Total 115 1.0   87 0.8   86 0.8  
Sex                  
 M 46 0.7 1.0 50 0.8 1.0 55 0.9 1.0
 F 69 1.4 2.0 37 0.8 1.0 31 0.6 0.7
Total 115 1.0   87 0.8   86 0.8  

*ERM=epiretinal membrane

DR=diabetic retinopathy.

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