Journal List > J Korean Ophthalmol Soc > v.50(8) > 1008333

Jung and Ho: Short-term Effect of Intravitreal Bevacizumab Injection Preventing Panretinal Photocoagulation-Induced Macular Edema in Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy

Abstract

Purpose:

To investigate the effect of intravitreal bevacizumab injection in preventing panretinal photocoagulation (PRP)-induced macular edema and visual dysfunction in proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

Methods:

We conducted a prospective study of 40 consecutive eyes (20 patients) with proliferative diabetic retinopathy whose visual acuity (logMAR) was 0.2 or less, foveal thickness (µ m) was 280 or less, and retinopathy was bilaterally symmetrical. In Group 1 (20 eyes), PRP was performed with intravitreal bevacizumab injection 1 week before the initiation of PRP, but in Group 2 (20 eyes) PRP alone was performed. In all eyes, PRP was completed using the same technique. Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and foveal and parafoveal thicknesses were measured before treatment and 1 and 3 months after PRP.

Results:

Before treatment, the mean BCVA and foveal and parafoveal thicknesses were not statistically significantly different between the two groups (p >0.05). At 1 and 3 months after PRP, the mean BCVA improved and the foveal and parafoveal thicknesses were significantly smaller in Group 1 than in Group 2 (p <0.05).

Conclusions:

Intravitreal bevacizumab injection before PRP could help prevent PRP-induced macular edema and visual dysfunction in patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy and good vision.

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Figure 1.
Bar graph illustrating percentage of eyes of each group according to best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) 3 months after treatment
jkos-50-1197f1.tif
Table 1.
Demographic data of intravitreal bevacizumab injected group (Group 1) and control group (Group 2)
Variables Group 1 (n=20) Group 2 (n=20) p
Gender      
  Male 12 14  
  Female 8 6  
Age (years) 53.5±6.79 54.1±6.15 0.871
Duration of DM (years) 9.15±4.53 8.98±5.01 0.678
Hemoglobin A1C (%) 7.16±0.87 7.24±0.69 0.632
Hypertension 125.7±12.3 128.1±10.3 0.545
(systolic/diastolic) /83.1±14.1 /87.4±11.7 /0.501
Lens      
  Phakic 16 18  
  Pseudophakic 4 2  

BCVA=best corrected visual acuity

DM=diabetes mellitus

P=Student ttest.

Table 2.
Comparison of BCVA, foveal and parafoveal thickness for intravitreal bevacizumab injected group (Group 1) and control group (Group 2)
Variables Group 1 (n=20) Group 2 (n=20) p
BCVA (logMAR)      
  Baseline 0.117±0.070 0.113±0.055 0.844
  1 month 0.107±0.072 0.216±0.144 0.005
  3 month 0.099±0.075 0.222±0.171 0.007
Foveal thickness (µm)      
  Baseline 240.5±25.9 238.4±24.4 0.798
  1 month 227.1±25.4 291.2±75.1 0.001
  3 month 222.9±26.2 292.8±77.2 0.001
Parafoveal thickness(µm)      
  Baseline 302.8±34.7 310.3±22.3 0.419
  1 month 300.2±28.6 350.5±52.9 0.001
  3 month 295.6±25.3 352.9±48.9 0.001

BCVA=best corrected visual acuity

logMAR=logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution

p=Student ttest.

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